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2013 Spring



Administrative Law



SLN #: 16205
Course Prefix: LAW-600
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Feller

Course Description:
A large portion of federal law is written, and enforced, by administrative agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Labor Relations Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Bureau of Land Management. This class examines the constitutional, statutory, and judge-made law governing the operations and authority of these administrative agencies. Topics will include the sources of administrative authority; the rationale for delegation of authority to administrative agencies; constitutional constraints on agency power; the different forms of agency rulemaking; agency adjudication of facts and law; the scope and purpose of judicial review of agency action; and the degree to which administrative agencies exercise executive, legislative and judicial powers.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Administrative Law



SLN #: 26229
Course Prefix: LAW-600
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Luff

Course Description:
A large portion of federal law is written, and enforced, by administrative agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Labor Relations Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Bureau of Land Management. This class examines the constitutional, statutory, and judge-made law governing the operations and authority of these administrative agencies. Topics will include the sources of administrative authority; the rationale for delegation of authority to administrative agencies; constitutional constraints on agency power; the different forms of agency rulemaking; agency adjudication of facts and law; the scope and purpose of judicial review of agency action; and the degree to which administrative agencies exercise executive, legislative and judicial powers.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Adv Legal Research



SLN #: 13931
Course Prefix: LAW-736
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Trotta

Course Description:
This course will focus on a rigorous review of the basic print and electronic resources and strategies for conducting legal research, federal and state. Case law, statutes and legislative history, administrative rules and procedures and finding tools will all be covered. This course is labor intensive. The best way to learn to conduct effective legal research is to use the full range of tools available and then practice, practice, practice! Students will be in class two hours per week. The third class hour is given to account for the time you will spend on the various homework assignments. Students will have frequent practice exercises, a midterm exam, and a research guide as a final project. This guide will allow students to apply their knowledge of legal research by discovering and evaluating information resources on a preapproved specialized topic of their choice.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Advanced Estate Planning



SLN #: 13940
Course Prefix: LAW-660
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Becker

Course Description:
This course will cover advanced estate planning and estate administration issues. Specifically, advanced valuation issues, marital deduction planning, fiduciary income tax, grantor trust income tax, issues relating to charitable trusts, and the generation skipping transfer tax. Estate and Gift Tax is a pre-requisite.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Estate & Gift Tax
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Grades will be assigned according to written papers.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is required
Online Course Site: None




Appellate Judging



SLN #: 12737
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 018
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Hessick

Course Description:
The courts of appeals play a central role in our legal system. They correct errors committed by the lower courts or agencies whose decisions they are reviewing, and they create legal rules for application in future cases. This class will explore these powers. It will also discuss the more practical procedural and substantive aspects of appellate review. Topics will include, among other things, how appellate courts perform their various functions, standards of review, institutional advantages and limitations of the courts of appeals, and the role of precedent. Grades will be determined based on class discussion and opinions that the students draft.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: Yes*
Note: The graduate writing requirement cannot be combined with the flexible writing or skills requirement. The flexible writing requirement can also be used to fulfill the skills requirement if they are both marked above.
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory attendance
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Applied Evidence in Trial Advocacy



SLN #: 17865
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 016
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Dallyn

Course Description:
Students learn trial advocacy by presenting opening statements, direct and cross-examination, objections, motions to the Court, final arguments and other aspects of trial practice. Students will also address issues of evidence law and civil procedure raised in the simulated trial practice problems. The course culminates in a jury trial. Student presentations will be videotaped for individual critique. Students will also learn how to use courtroom technology for displaying evidentiary exhibits or visual aids and will be asked to use this technology during their presentations.

Students who have taken Trial Advocacy will not be allowed to take this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes, Pleadings and motions related to final trials/individual in-class presentations.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Arizona Constitutional Law



SLN #: 12727
Course Prefix: LAW-658
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Bender

Course Description:
This course will address some of the most important provisions of the Arizona Constitution and the way in which those provisions have been interpreted and applied by the Arizona Supreme Court. Emphasis will be placed on provisions that are different, in either their text or judicial interpretation, from provisions of the United States Constitution. Topics will include the Arizona Constitution's provisions relating to "direct democracy" (recall, initiative and referendum elections); the respective powers of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of Arizona government; Arizona constitutional rights that are similar to, but more extensive than, individual rights contained in the U.S. Constitution; Arizona individual rights that are not found in the U.S. Constitution; and the legal relationship between the Arizona and U.S. Constitutions. The focus will be on issues of current importance The class uses materials compiled by the instructor

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Con Law I and Con Law II. Con Law II may be taken concurrently.
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Class attendance highly advisable
Online Course Site: None




Arizona Media Law



SLN #: 12722
Course Prefix: LAW-705
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Bodney

Course Description:
This seminar draws together the academic and practical elements of media law, with a particular emphasis on translating constitutional theory into legal action in Arizona. The course covers issues involving access to information (e.g., public records, open meetings, FOIA), interference with the news gathering process (subpoenas, search warrants, gag orders), limitations on content (prior restraints, libel, invasion of privacy) and other "hot topics" in media law. In addition, the course focuses on the tensions between law and ethics in the legal and journalistic disciplines, and how the aspirational considerations of the two professions both inform and obscure the duties of reporters and their counsel. Finally, the course explores the analytical and precedential limitations on the absolutist rhetoric of the First Amendment. Some background in constitutional or media law is recommended.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Arizona vs. Federal Rules of Evidence



SLN #: 26525
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 030
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Dallyn

Course Description:
This course will focus primarily on differences between Arizona and Federal evidence rules. But it also will give some attention to Arizona rules that may have been changed substantively by amendments to the Arizona Rules of Evidence that became effective on January 1, 2012.

Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course must have taken the basic Evidence course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Evidence
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Arizona Water Law



SLN #: 21706
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 013
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Feller;McGinnis

Course Description:
Water is a crucial and scarce commodity in the desert southwest, and decisions about the allocation of water will have a profound effect on the future of the region and its environment. These decisions involve competition for water between neighboring states, between agricultural, residential, and industrial users, between Indian tribes and their non-Indian neighbors, and between environmental preservation and commercial development. This seminar will focus on Arizona water allocation issues currently pending in several different forums, including Arizona and federal courts, the United States Congress, the Arizona legislature, Arizona and federal administrative agencies, and negotiations between private parties. Featured topics will likely include the ongoing adjudication of water rights in the Gila River and its tributaries, settlements of Indian tribal water rights claims, allocation of Colorado River water, the effect of the Endangered Species Act on water use and allocation, proposals to drain Lake Powell, the relationship between surface water and groundwater law, and the public trust doctrine.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Bankruptcy Litigation (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 22106
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: A02
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Salerno;Kroop

Course Description:
This course will meet for 6 weeks beginning Friday, January 11, 2013.

This course examines the differences between litigating in bankruptcy court versus other litigation forums. Special rules and practices applicable to bankruptcy proceedings will be addressed, including: • Presentation of the case in a bench trial before a sophisticated trier of fact (the bankruptcy judge) • Discovery devices, such as Bankruptcy Rule 2004 examinations • The use of expert witnesses in bankruptcy court • Preparing and presenting the case through such devices as declarations in lieu of direct testimony • Effective cross-examination in bankruptcy court • The most important and useful evidence rules in bankruptcy court • Evidentiary objections

Grades will be based on class participation and performance in in-class practical exercises.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Biotechnology: Science, Law and Policy



SLN #: 16209
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Marchant

Course Description:
This course will examine the legal, regulatory, scientific, policy and ethical aspects of biotechnology, focusing on genetically engineered plants, animals, foods, drugs, vaccines, and other products. Among the issues to be covered include an overview of the scientific methods for genetically engineering plants and animals, the risks and benefits of genetically modified (GM) crops and animals, the regulation of GM foods and other products, labeling of biotechnology products, regulatory issues relating to biopharmaceuticals, liability issues, intellectual property issues, antitrust and business law issues, contamination issues, the role of the public in GM decision, state and local regulation, international regulation, international trade, bioprospecting/biopiracy, and bioterrorism.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Research Paper
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Paper Required
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance included in participation points
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Block



SLN #:
Course Prefix: LAW-000
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s):

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Block



SLN #:
Course Prefix: LAW-000
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s):

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Business Organizations



SLN #: 12731
Course Prefix: LAW-654
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Gubler

Course Description:
This course examines the legal constraints that apply to business organizations with an emphasis on how the law addresses the problem of the separation of ownership from control in publicly held corporations. Alternatives to the corporate form, including partnership and the limited liability company, will also be addressed, although primarily as a comparative tool for achieving a more in-depth understanding of the corporation. Topics will include fiduciary law, shareholder voting, derivative suits, executive compensation and control transactions. These issues will be most relevant to those students who plan on representing business entities in transactions or litigation, however, it is difficult to overstate the importance of a general knowledge of these topics regardless of the area of law in which one plans to practice. Materials to be announced. No background in business, accounting or finance is required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes. Participation in class discussion is expected.
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Business, Law & Society



SLN #: 21760
Course Prefix: LAW-494
Course Section: B01
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Herbert

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Business, Law & Society



SLN #: 27072
Course Prefix: LAW-494
Course Section: B02
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Herbert

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Chapter 11 Bankruptcy



SLN #: 26470
Course Prefix: LAW-655
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Haines

Course Description:
This course will cover the law and practice of reorganizing business entities under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code. It will begin with the history of reorganization law and a survey of the kinds of financial problems for which chapter 11 provides a remedy. It will then address strategic issues in the filing of the case and the operational issues of maintaining a viable business entity while undergoing reorganization. The core of the course is how creditors’ claims and equity interests can be treated and modified in a plan of reorganization, and how such treatment can resolve the financial issues that necessitated the filing. This will include not only the legal requirements for permissible treatment but also the procedural and voting mechanisms necessary to obtain acceptance of the plan by classes of creditors or its confirmation by the court over the objections of creditors. It will conclude with consideration of how to negotiate and draft an acceptable plan. If time permits certain post- confirmation issues may also be covered such as continuing jurisdiction of the bankruptcy court, res judicata effect of the confirmation order, remedies for plan defaults and successive bankruptcy filings. Attendance is expected and up to two points will be added or subtracted for participation. Neither Creditor/Debtor Relations, Business Associations, Secured Transactions nor basic Bankruptcy is a required prerequisite, but both Bankruptcy and Secured Transactions are highly recommended as providing useful background.

This Spring 2013 is the last time Judge Haines will teach this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Regular attendance is expected
Online Course Site: None




Civil Justice Clinic-Homeowner Advoc Unit



SLN #: 12738
Course Prefix: LAW-773
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Dauber

Course Description:
The Civil Justice Clinic provides students with the opportunity to provide quality representation to individuals and non profit organizations who need pro bono representation. In addition to client representation and community education work, the Clinic includes a mandatory seminar component that focuses on relevant substantive law (such as laws relating to real estate lending, employment, supporting military families, and ADR), training/simulations on lawyering skills (such as legislative lawyering, courtroom advocacy, public speaking, fact investigation, interviewing, counseling, and negotiation), and case rounds.

Students enrolled in the Homeowner Advocacy Unit work on civil disputes, administrative proceedings, legislative lawyering, and community education matters involving fraudulent schemes against homeowners and renters, foreclosure avoidance, predatory mortgage lending cases and related issues.

With faculty supervision, students are responsible for all aspects of representing Clinic clients, including: case selection; interviewing and counseling clients; fact investigation; theory and advocacy strategy development; analyzing options for changing employment and advocating for policy changes to address foreclosure crisis; drafting demand letters, pleadings, motions, appellate briefs, settlements, and policy documents such as white papers, amicus briefs, analysis of pending legislation, comments to administrative agencies, or testimony; and representing clients in negotiations with other parties, administrative hearings, civil litigation or at oral arguments in state or federal court.

The Clinic is a graded 6 credit course. Students are expected to spend approximately 20 hours per week and at least 300 hours total in the Clinic during the semester. For more information, see the Clinic’s webpage at http://law.asu.edu/clinics.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: > Students must have taken or concurrently be enrolled in Evidence,
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Directors of the Clinic and the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Civil Justice Clinic-Workplace Flex Unit



SLN #: 21718
Course Prefix: LAW-773
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Karin

Course Description:
The Civil Justice Clinic provides students with the opportunity to provide quality representation to individuals and non profit organizations who need pro bono representation. In addition to client representation and community education work, the Clinic includes a mandatory seminar component that focuses on relevant substantive law (such as laws relating to real estate lending, employment, supporting military families, and ADR), training/simulations on lawyering skills (such as legislative lawyering, courtroom advocacy, public speaking, fact investigation, interviewing, counseling, and negotiation), and case rounds.

Students in the Work-Life Policy Unit work on civil disputes, administrative proceedings, legislative lawyering, and community education matters involving unemployment insurance benefits, flexible scheduling, wage and hour, time off, discrimination and other employment law issues.

With faculty supervision, students are responsible for all aspects of representing Clinic clients, including: case selection; interviewing and counseling clients; fact investigation; theory and advocacy strategy development; analyzing options for changing employment and advocating for policy changes to address foreclosure crisis; drafting demand letters, pleadings, motions, appellate briefs, settlements, and policy documents such as white papers, amicus briefs, analysis of pending legislation, comments to administrative agencies, or testimony; and representing clients in negotiations with other parties, administrative hearings, civil litigation or at oral arguments in state or federal court.

The Clinic is a graded 6 credit course. Students are expected to spend approximately 20 hours per week and at least 300 hours total in the Clinic during the semester. For more information, see the Clinic’s webpage at law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Students must have taken or concurrently be enrolled in Evidence,
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Directors of the Clinic and the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 6
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Civil Pretrial Practice



SLN #: 12705
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Cohen

Course Description:
This skills course will focus on the several aspects of pre-trial practice in civil litigation, including discovery planning and implementation, disclosure, interrogatories, requests for production, requests for admissions, examinations and viewings, depositions, discovery sanctions and pre-trial motion practice. Students will explore both the strategic and tactical aspects of pre-trial practice. Through a series of mini-projects and classroom exercises and simulations based on a hypothetical case students will begin to develop skills in pre-trial litigation. These mini-projects and classroom activities will provide the basis for evaluation in this pass-fail course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Civil Procedure II



SLN #: 17740
Course Prefix: LAW-602
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Bartels

Course Description:
Civil Procedure II is a four-credit course that will focus on the Rules of Civil Procedure (rather than non-Rules topics such as jurisdiction and res judicata) and how lawyers use the Rules in litigating civil cases from initiation through the pre-trial stages. The class sessions will be devoted primarily to "re-litigating" a real personal-injury case, Ruelas v. APS, under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (but with attention to significant differences between the Federal and Arizona Rules of Civil Procedure). The course materials will consist of a series of handouts that include (a) questions that ask students to apply the relevant Rules to the Ruelas case; (b) important case precedents; and (c) investigative reports, court papers, and documentary and photographic exhibits from the actual Ruelas case file. The course will re-cover some topics that were covered in most first-year Civil Procedure sections in the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic years, either quickly to refresh recollections or in considerably more depth; and the course also will cover Rules that were not covered in any meaningful sense in the first year. The idea is to concentrate on those areas that are most important to the pre-trial litigation process (and, coincidentally, to the bar exam). The final exam will be a combination of short-answer and traditional essay questions. Students will be permitted to bring any inanimate object that does not belong to the Law Library with them to the exam.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Civil Rights Legislation



SLN #: 26466
Course Prefix: LAW-620
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Calleros

Course Description:
This course will examine the Reconstruction-era Civil Rights Acts, particularly sections 1981, 1983, 1985, and 1988 of Title 42 of the U.S. Code, with an emphasis on sections 1981 and 1983. Section 1981 imposes liability for racial discrimination in contractual relations, and section 1983 imposes liability for deprivation of federal rights under the auspices of state authority. The latter will consume most of the semester. Although we will necessarily discuss federal constitutional and statutory rights that litigants seek to vindicate under section 1983, our study will focus on the statutory prerequisites to liability, such as the requirement that the deprivation be taken "under the color of" state law, various immunities from liability, standards for imposing liability on supervisors or governmental entities, and remedies. The class will also briefly address other civil rights issues, such as employment discrimination under Title VII and civil rights issues that may emerge during the semester.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Prof. reserves discretion, as allowed by policies.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Claims/Gov't Entities (2nd 6 weeks)



SLN #: 26518
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: B02
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Gaughan

Course Description:
This class will meet on Mondays for 5 weeks from 5:30pm - 7:55 pm beginning Monday, March 18, and continuing through Monday, April 15.

This class provides an overview of the unique challenges encountered in bringing and defending claims against state, local and federal governmental entities. The course addresses the history of sovereign immunity, its statutory abrogation and the procedures and prerequisites necessary to prosecute and defend claims against the government. This class will inform students of the law and mechanics of litigating claims against governmental entities using statutory and case law to inform students of the practicalities and pitfalls common to litigation against the government.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Class Actions



SLN #: 26474
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 022
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Carey

Course Description:
If certain requirements are satisfied, Federal Civil Procedure Rule 23 permits aggregate litigation in the form of a class action. This popular procedural device has been used in various substantive areas – e.g., antitrust, civil rights, consumer protection, employment, mass torts and securities – to resolve legal claims en masse. This course will focus on the procedural aspects of class action law, making the course content relevant to all types of class actions, without regard to the substantive nature of the claims. We will examine the requirements for class certification, the manner in which the class certification decision is made, the procedural protections required for class litigation, as well as various constitutional and other issues impacting the conclusive reach of litigated or settled class actions. The course is recommended for students with an interest in litigation and for those with an academic interest in this often hyped, and sometimes maligned, form of claim resolution.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Collab Pract of Law & Soc Psych Principles



SLN #: 18023
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 020
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): O'Grady

Course Description:
In this class, students will explore social psychology principles that relate to decision making and exercising judgment within the dynamics of the professional legal workplace. The seminar will cover both intrapersonal and interpersonal principles as they relate to the practice of law, particularly from the perspective of the new attorney’s workplace dynamics. Students will study decision making biases and heuristics, the impact of social influences in exercising professional judgment, and decision making within the legal work group hierarchies that exist in practice. To prepare students to work collaboratively in the legal profession students will be required to complete a team assignment. Graduation Writing Requirement is available through a separate independent study.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Conflict of Laws



SLN #: 21727
Course Prefix: LAW-603
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Higdon

Course Description:
Conflict of laws deals with cases that involve more than one jurisdiction. The subject includes the jurisdiction of courts over nonresidents; which jurisdiction's laws apply to controversies between residents of different states or when a dispute arises from events or transactions that transcend state boundaries; constitutional and other limits on the parties' right to choose applicable law; conflicts between state and federal laws; and recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. Many issues that will be discussed are as old as our federal system. Others are as recent as today's headlines, e.g., does the Full Faith and Credit Clause permit a state to impose its public policy to reject marriages sanctioned in another state? Conflict of laws was recently added by the Arizona Supreme Court as a subject that may be covered in the essay portion of the Arizona Bar Examination.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Constitutional Law I



SLN #: 12723
Course Prefix: LAW-522
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Bender

Course Description:
The role of courts in the federal system; the distribution of powers between state and federal governments; separation of powers within the federal government.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Constitutional Law I



SLN #: 12734
Course Prefix: LAW-522
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Clinton

Course Description:
Constitutional Law I surveys the law surrounding the allocation of governmental power between federal, state, and tribal governments and the distribution of governmental authority within the federal government. It is a pervasive subject in the sense that such constitutional questions can emerge in such disparate areas of legal practice as immigration, corporations and securities, family law, criminal law, banking, and insurance. While the course does not cover individual constitutional rights (the subject matter of Constitutional Law II and Criminal Procedure), questions of Congressional power to enforce various constitutional rights are raised as part of the course coverage. Furthermore, the framers of Constitution did not see the bright line that most law school curriculums currently draw between allocation of power and individual rights questions, since many statements in the Constitutional Convention and the ratification documents suggest that the framers thought that the primary protection of individual liberty should be a constitution appropriately distributing and limiting delegated governmental authority, rather than a listing of rights of the type found in the Bill of Rights. This course not only seeks to provide a survey of contemporary federal constitutional law, but also provides basic insights into American constitutional and jurisprudential history. The reason for such attention to history involves demonstrating how constitutional law has changed over time, often with the ebb and flow of national intellectual, political, and economic history surrounding prevailing jurisprudential and economic trends and movements. That focus trains students not only how to understand past constitutional developments but how to anticipate future changes in constitutional doctrine in response to national political and intellectual trends. Consequently, the legal, jurisprudential, economic and political history of the United States will play a prominent role in the course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes-see Syllabus
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Special Withdrawal Course: Yes
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Participation Points: Yes-see Syllabus
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: See Syllabus
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Constitutional Law I



SLN #: 12736
Course Prefix: LAW-522
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Gartner

Course Description:
The role of courts in the federal system; the distribution of powers between state and federal governments; separation of powers within the federal government.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Constitutional Law I



SLN #: 26588
Course Prefix: LAW-522
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): O'Grady

Course Description:
The role of courts in the federal system; the distribution of powers between state and federal governments; separation of powers within the federal government.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Constitutional Law II



SLN #: 12739
Course Prefix: LAW-625
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Weinstein

Course Description:
The course deals with federal constitutional protection of individuals' rights other than the rights of defendants in criminal proceedings. Areas of emphasis are freedom of expression, freedom of religion, the right to privacy, and the right to equal protection of the laws.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Construction Law



SLN #: 16210
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Holden

Course Description:
This course, which focuses on practical construction law issues, is being taught by an experienced practicing lawyer. Topics that will be covered include: types of construction contracts; the basic relationships among the owners, architects/engineers, general contractors, subcontractors and material suppliers on a project; express and implied warranties; the role of the schedule and claims related to scheduling; change orders and concealed site condition claims; mechanics' liens, stop notices and other payment remedies; types of insurance and insurance coverage disputes on construction projects; proving damages; and the trial of a construction case and the use expert witnesses. The class will be taught using case studies and the case method; extensive student participation during class is expected.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Contemporary Issues in Tribal Economic Development



SLN #: 16208
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: D01
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Morgan

Course Description:
Class will meet Monday, March 11 through Friday, March 15.
Monday through Thursday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Friday 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Administration of the Final Exam will be discussed in class.

The class is limited to 10 students - if there is more student demand, students seeking the Indian Law certificate will receive preference.

This spring break course will be held in Nebraska on the Winnebago reservation at Ho-Chunk, Inc.. Ho-Chunk, Inc. (HCI) is the award-winning economic development corporation owned by the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Established in 1994 in Winnebago, Nebraska with one employee, HCI has grown to over 1,100 employees with operations in Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, Minnesota, Kansas, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Florida, Washington, D.C., Afghanistan, Mexico and Iraq. HCI operates 18 subsidiaries in a diverse range of industries including information technology, construction, government contracting, professional services, wholesale distribution, office products and technology, logistics, marketing, media and retail.

The class is designed to train students to implement practical political, legal and economic solutions to help Tribe's implement a broad range of economic development activities. It is offered by Lance Morgan, who has combined his legal and business expertise to develop one of the most successful native owned corporations in the country, Ho-Chunk, Inc. Historically Federal Indian Law has had a negative effect on tribal economic development by limiting the tribes in a number of ways. The seminar will focus the economic impediments create by Federal Indian Law. The class seminar will not just describe the problem but give real examples of how tribes have actually overcome such legal impediments to create successful businesses and bypass some of the legal restrictions. Additionally, the seminar will also focus on having the students understand Federal Indian Law is restrictive in nature and that if they are going to be successful lawyers that they will have to use Federal Indian Law as a starting point, not an endpoint.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 10
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Contract Drafting/Negotiations



SLN #: 26472
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 020
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Chesler

Course Description:
This course provides students with the opportunity to learn the basic principles of contract drafting, interpretation, and negotiation. This course will also introduce students to the role of the transactional lawyer. Emphasis will be placed on drafting contractual agreements that effectuate clients’ needs and anticipate potential legal problems. Students will be required to work independently and collaboratively to negotiate and draft a series of written contracts, such as a sales agreement, an employment agreement, and a settlement agreement. Students may also be required to perform research relating to the drafting of those contracts. On all of these assignments, students will receive feedback.

This course is open to JD candidates only.

This class is a hybrid class, consisting of both weekly in person classes as well as an online component.

Students who enroll in this course will also be added into a 1 credit independent study for a total of 3 credits for the class.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Contracts
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Corp Governance & PR Seminar



SLN #: 12724
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 012
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Lynk

Course Description:
For-profit, business corporations are organized to make money. By maximizing profits businesses achieve their highest social utility -- they provide goods or services to consumers; profits to shareholders; jobs and wages to employees; and tax revenue to the state. How does good corporate governance promote the goals of a good corporate citizen? What is good corporate governance? Who is entitled or required to make the decisions necessary for a business corporation to function? What legal and ethical constraints do we as a society impose on corporate decision-makers in the exercise of their responsibilities? Are these constraints working? Is it appropriate to impose civil or criminal liability on a publicly-traded corporation, which can act only through its agents and directors, for the illegal conduct of those agents or directors? Do corporate lawyers have a duty as "gatekeepers" to the board of directors, the shareholders and the corporation itself, to insure that a proper governance structure is in place and is being followed, and that business decisions are being made in conformity with the law? What lessons should we learn about the need for good corporate governance structures from: the failure of Enron and other corporations at the start of this decade; the housing mortgage crisis; the failures of major financial services corporations; the sale of collateralized debt obligations; and the recent recession?

This seminar will examine these questions through various case studies drawn from different industries, from the past as well as today. A desk book of materials including various articles, state and federal cases, and excerpts from recent federal legislation, will be prepared and made available from the Copy Center. A casebook is not currently required.

The goal of the course is to illustrate the variety and complexity of dilemmas lawyers can face when advising corporate clients, and help students use the legal tools available to them to work through these problems toward satisfactory solutions. As a part of the seminar, students will be divided into teams of two persons each, and each team will make a PowerPoint presentation to the class on a corporate governance topic, chosen after consultation with Prof. Lynk, involving a particular corporation or industry. At the end of the course these presentations will be complied onto a disc and copies of the disc will be distributed to the entire class. Each student will also write a final paper.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes, seminar paper is required
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Prerequisite: Business Organizations
Special Withdrawal Course: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is required
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Creative Writing for Lawyers



SLN #: 12713
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 009
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Feeney

Course Description:
This class will meet on 8 Wednesdays during the semester: January 9, 23, 30, February 6, 13, 27, and March 6 and 27.

The first class will be a lecture/demonstration on how creative writing can aid and abet legal writing. The remaining seven classes will consist of a lecture-discussion session and a writing workshop. Each student will write and post seven writing assignments on the class web site. We will critique one another’s writings every week (both on-line and in class). All students must write. Students afflicted with writer’s block or unreliable Internet connections should not take this course. Reliable email service is essential. The class web site will run on Blackboard. All students should be familiar with the usual process of accessing, reviewing, and posting material to a Blackboard site.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Creative Writing for Lawyers



SLN #: 26716
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: A04
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Stuart

Course Description:
This course will meet for 8 weeks beginning Thursday, January 10. The last class will be held Thursday, February 28.

The core thesis underlying this course is that legal writing can be greatly improved by using many of the techniques fiction writers use. The notion of story, emotional vibrancy, and profluence are creative additions to otherwise drab legal writing.

Each student will write and post seven writing assignments on the class web site. We will critique one another’s writings every week (both on-line and in class). All students must write. Students afflicted with writer’s block or unreliable Internet connections should not take this course. Reliable email service is essential. The class web site will run on Blackboard. All students should be familiar with the usual process of accessing, reviewing, and posting material to a Blackboard site.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Law



SLN #: 12690
Course Prefix: LAW-516
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Hessick

Course Description:
Basic principles of criminal liability. Acts and omissions (actus reus), mental states and negligence (mens rea), excuses (e.g., insanity), justifications (e.g., self defense)--all ultimately illustrated in a sample crime (usually homicide).

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Law



SLN #: 12704
Course Prefix: LAW-516
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Kader

Course Description:
Basic principles of criminal liability. Acts and omissions (actus reus), mental states and negligence (mens rea), excuses (e.g., insanity), justifications (e.g., self defense)--all ultimately illustrated in a sample crime (usually homicide).

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Law



SLN #: 12726
Course Prefix: LAW-516
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sigler

Course Description:
Basic principles of criminal liability. Acts and omissions (actus reus), mental states and negligence (mens rea), excuses (e.g., insanity), justifications (e.g., self defense)--all ultimately illustrated in a sample crime (usually homicide).

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Law



SLN #: 26587
Course Prefix: LAW-516
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Murphy

Course Description:
Basic principles of criminal liability. Why have the criminal law and why punish? Acts and omissions (actus reus), mental states and negligence (mens rea), excuses (e.g., insanity), justifications (e.g., self defense)--all ultimately illustrated in a sample crime (usually homicide). The instructor, who prefers talking with students rather than talking to stenographers, does not permit the use of laptop computers in this class.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Practice Clinic



SLN #: 12698
Course Prefix: LAW-774
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Zettler

Course Description:
Students enrolled in the Criminal Practice Clinic prosecute misdemeanor cases in courts in the area. Students are responsible for a full range of trial-related tasks, including witness interviews, pre-trial motions, and courtroom advocacy. The Criminal Practice Clinic provides somewhat more frequent opportunities for trial work and fewer opportunities for such tasks as client interviewing, counseling, and discovery than the other clinics. Students are placed with various City Attorney Offices in the area (usually Tempe, Chandler, Glendale, Scottsdale, Mesa, Gilbert, Peoria, and the County Attorney's Office), and work under the direct supervision of assistant city attorneys. Overall supervision of the Criminal Practice Clinic is provided by Faculty Associate Hugo Zettler. At the beginning of the semester, students will work on simple cases against defendants who represent themselves. Students then move to cases where an attorney is representing the defendant. Eventually each student will conduct a jury trial under a supervisor's advisement.

Students are expected to spend 300 hours in the Clinic during the semester (approximately 30 hours of classroom instruction and 270 hours in an assigned prosecutor's office). Because the summer session is condensed, students should not plan on working another job during the summer semester. As a general guideline, students are expected to work 20 hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and 30 hours per week during the summer semester (OR 30 hours per week for 10 weeks, or 40 hours per week for 8 weeks).

During the fall and spring semesters, blocks of time must be available to be in the courtroom. During the summer, students should be available all day, every day, five days a week. The blocks of time needed during the fall and spring semesters are four (4) hours in the morning (8 a.m. - noon) or afternoon (1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.). Students' fieldwork schedule for the fall and spring should be set up as one of the following:

1. five (5) half days; or
2. two (2) full days and one (1) half day; or
3. one (1) full day and three (3) half days.

If a student is interested in working at the City of Phoenix, Tuesdays and Thursdays must be completely available.

Each student will be given the opportunity to list his or her first, second, third, etc. choices for the office at which he or she would like to work. Professor Zettler will do his best to give students their first choice, but this is not always possible. Please be aware that some prosecutor offices may require a drug test.

The Criminal Practice Clinic has a mandatory seminar component that addresses various problems in the prosecution of criminal cases. The seminar sessions include simulation exercises in trial practice, including how to do direct examination, cross examination, and present opening statements and closing arguments. Classes during the summer are on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. During the fall and spring semesters, classes are on Wednesday evenings.

The Criminal Practice Clinic is a graded course (6 credits). Evidence is a pre-requisite. Students must have taken or concurrently be enrolled in Professional Responsibility, Criminal Law and Civil Procedure. Trial Advocacy is not a prerequisite, but if students have been through this course, the skills are beneficial to students' cases. Students may not take Trial Advocacy and the Criminal Practice Clinic in the same semester.

Enrollment in the Criminal Practice Clinic is limited to eight (8) students during the summer session and ten (10) students in the fall and spring semesters.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence is a pre-requisite. Students must have taken or concurrently be enrolled in Professional Responsibility, Criminal Law and Civil Procedure.
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Procedure



SLN #: 12725
Course Prefix: LAW-604
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Kader

Course Description:
A study of constitutional criminal procedure with major emphasis on the Sixth Amendment's right to counsel, the Fifth Amendment's right against self-incrimination, and the Fourth Amendment's right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Sentencing Seminar & Workshop



SLN #: 26519
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Popko

Course Description:
This course has two distinct components: a seminar and a sentencing workshop. The seminar will meet once a week. It will cover issues in sentencing theory and policy, including theories of punishment, aggravating and mitigating sentencing factors, mandatory minimum sentences, and the Supreme Court’s Sixth Amendment sentencing cases. Each student will complete two papers, each approximately 10 – 15 pages in length. Students will select topics from among those provided by the professor. Students will also be required to create discussion questions for a number of seminar meetings and to lead at least one class discussion during the semester. Attendance and class participation are mandatory.

The sentencing workshop will meet all day on or about Friday, April 12, 2013. Workshop participants will include all students enrolled in the seminar and six sitting Maricopa County Superior Court judges. In preparation for the workshop, students will read materials from actual criminal cases and prepare memoranda describing their views on appropriate sentences in those cases. Students will also engage in a simulated oral argument for one of the cases. Students will receive either written or oral feedback from the instructor on each of these assignments. Students MUST commit to attending the workshop to enroll in this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Criminal procedure is highly recommended. Advanced Criminal Procedure is also recommended.
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




DC Externship



SLN #: 12719
Course Prefix: LAW-785
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 9
Instructor(s): Askland

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 9
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Death Penalty



SLN #: 12717
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 010
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Baich

Course Description:
This course will survey the major constitutional and operational issues with respect to the death penalty in the United States. The required readings for each class will consist primarily of United States Supreme Court decisions, copies of the assigned cases (and on occasion other materials) can be obtained through the library. From time to time supplemental materials will be distributed in class. All students are expected to read the assigned cases and other materials prior to class. Grades in this class will be based on CLASS PARTICIPATION, WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS AND ATTENDANCE.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Decedent's Estates



SLN #: 12707
Course Prefix: LAW-618
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Becker

Course Description:
The Decedent's Estates course will provide an overview of the law of intestacy, wills, probate and non-testamentary property transfers. This course focuses on common law and a comparison between the Uniform Probate Code and the Arizona statutes. Drafting issues and techniques are covered. The course is comprehensive, but does NOT cover complex estate planning or tax. This course is important for all second and/or third year law students. Every lawyer should have a working knowledge of wills and estates. This is also a major subject on most bar exams. This course will use the Dukeminier Johanson "Wills, Trusts and Estates" casebook, and will cover chapters 1 - 8 therein.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Domestic Violence & the Law



SLN #: 12730
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 015
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Buel

Course Description:
Given the frequency with which domestic violence victims turn to the courts for help, this course will examine the construction of rights within civil and criminal law, including those involving alternative procedural frameworks. We begin with law and the social context of battering, including how the experience of abuse is shaped by race, cultural identity, economic status, sexual orientation, and disabilities. We next view how the law recognizes domestic violence in relation to child custody, divorce, visitation, and child protection matters. Among other topics, the course will also cover tort liability for batterers and third parties (police, employers, etc.), and federal remedies, such as the Violence Against Women Act. Criminal law aspects are addressed within the role of protective orders, prosecution, and defense, including self-defense for victims and ethical representation of batterers. Violence against women as a human rights violation and in the context of human trafficking and sexual assault are introduced, with discussions designed to bridge theory and practice. The focus of the class is to examine current challenges and shortcomings in the legal response to intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking, and then draft proposals for systems change through the social justice lens.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Minimum 20 page paper
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 25
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: 10%
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: No
Online Course Site: None




Econ Dev in Indian Country



SLN #: 26506
Course Prefix: LAW-718
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Dworkin

Course Description:
This seminar will focus on a wide range of tribal economic development issues. Relevant federal case law, statutes, regulations, and case studies will be used as background material, but the primary purpose of the seminar will be to describe and analyze the political, legal, economic, structural, and cultural issues faced by tribes when trying to develop their economies. Additional emphasis will be placed on how tribal initiatives may conflict with federal case law, state jurisdiction, and federal policies towards tribal economic development. The seminar's focus will be on helping identify and implement creative tribal-based solutions. Although the relevant federal Indian case law will be discussed when necessary, having taken a course in Federal Indian law will be helpful.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




E-Discovery and Digital Evidence



SLN #: 17743
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 018
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Holm

Course Description:
The advent of e-discovery has had an extraordinary impact on American jurisprudence. The unbridled proliferation of e-mail and other forms of electronically stored information (“ESI”) has proved daunting to litigants, counsel and the courts. ESI has eclipsed other forms of evidence and has required a radical change in how disputes are litigated and resolved. Recent e-discovery amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the rules of many states, including Arizona, are a testament to the judiciary’s recognition of the growing importance of e-discovery in our judicial system. This course will address the rapidly developing e-discovery case law and tackle the challenging issues arising from the emerging e-discovery phenomenon. Subject areas covered will include a survey of relevant information technology, ESI preservation obligations, search and retrieval, ESI production methods, spoliation and sanctions, attorney-client privilege and ethical issues, and admissibility of digital evidence.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Education & the Law



SLN #: 16260
Course Prefix: LAW-721
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Herf

Course Description:
NOTE: This class will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:30 pm - 3:25 pm for ten weeks beginning Monday, January 14. The last class will be Wednesday, March 27.

A review of the legal and policy considerations that provide the foundation of the law of public education. This will include a review of student and employee rights, Constitution and Statutory rights, funding issues, legal and practical aspects of governing bodies, rights and responsibilities of administrators, teachers [including statutory child abuse reporting requirements and immunity issues], collective bargaining and employee concerted activity and students.

This advanced course in education addresses constitutional law, federal and state statutory and regulatory provision and case law . The studies will encompass the development of statutory and case including their impact upon education in the United States and the State of Arizona. The class will analyze and report on analyze major decisions of the United States Supreme Court in the areas of finance, religion, free speech, collective bargaining, student and teacher rights, rights of the disabled, desegregation and discrimination including recent Arizona decisions. The major critical legal issues in traditional public charter and private education will be discussed. Each student as a significant part of the class and their grade will select from a list of suggested areas or designate an area of interest and prepare a paper power and partner with the instructor to lead the class discussion on the topic. The presentation should be scheduled to fill the major component of the class time and will be the focus of each student to master a particular area of law. Practical skills application will be used in the final two class period with outside expert witnesses and student participants in all roles involving student expulsion with issues related to guns at school and disability identification and accommodation by the District.. If scheduling permits a session shall be devoted to an employee grievance and the resolution process. We will analyze several U.S. Supreme Court decisions involving educational issues, their history and future impact.

Course Structure/Approach
This course will consist of lecture, individual and group assignments,on Constitutional issues, including major topical presentation by each student or in some instances a two student team where you will teach for that class period using a power point outline followed by a paper on the chosen subject of law review quality. A special education due process expulsion hearing which will incorporate issues involving school rules, special education and due process will comprise the final two sessions of the class. Student roles will include the lawyers for the District seeking expulsion, lawyers for the family opposing expulsion, the cast of participants and the decision making make school board who will debate the evidence.

Grading/Assessment
Topical Paper, Power Point and Classroom presentation-75% of final grade;
Attendance and Participation-Essential as it will constitute 25 % of the final grade

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes, see course description
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes, see course description
Participation Points: Yes, see course description
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Election Law



SLN #: 26476
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 023
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Liburdi

Course Description:
This course reviews the key federal and Arizona constitutional provisions, statutes, and court decisions governing such topics as the expansion of the franchise, presidential selection, redistricting, campaign finance reform, and direct democracy. Weekly lectures may include guest speakers who have participated in federal and state campaigns.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Class attendance is mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Employment Law



SLN #: 13928
Course Prefix: LAW-629
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Tiffen

Course Description:
The course is a survey course covering the major statutes and common law governing the employment relationship. Subjects include discrimination in employment, wage and hour law, workplace safety, employee benefits, wrongful discharge, and the National Labor Relations Act, and other statutory and common law regulation of the employment relationship.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Entertainment Business Contracts



SLN #: 16257
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 014
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Mableson

Course Description:
The business of film, television, book publishing, and music publishing, sound recording, online games and virtual worlds, and new media is rapidly expanding and converging in the digital age. As more and more people are engaging with digital entertainment, content creators are discovering ways to produce and deliver content faster and more effectively. The legal issues that accompany the creation of content in our interconnected world present opportunities for future lawyers to develop traditional and non-traditional practices in the Arts & Entertainment industry.

This 3.0 credit course is designed as an introduction to the Entertainment business by way of an intense review of the cases and contracts that are typically used to document the myriad of business relationships in the industry. The course is intended to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the issues and contract terms typically encountered in the arts, entertainment, and media business. Case law and contracts are the lens through which Entertainment business and law will be taught.

In addition to providing instruction in the legal issues in the Entertainment business, the class will teach students essential contract drafting considerations that will be transportable to other industries and practice areas.

Grade will be based on class participation (25%) and a final, written exam (75%).

Instructor (adjunct):

Connie J. Mableson, JD: Ms. Mableson is an intellectual property attorney in practice for almost 30 years. Her practice emphasis is arts and entertainment and internet, technology, and virtual worlds. She has represented successful clients in all aspects of the entertainment business including Stephenie Meyers (Twilight), Allison DuBois (The Medium), and many New York Times best-selling authors, independent film projects, musicians, publishers, and game developers. She is a member of the ABA section of Science and Technology, and Forum on Sports & Entertainment. Connie is the former Chair of the City of Phoenix Arts and Culture Commission and has extensive experience in entertainment deal-making.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Contract Law and Legal Writing, Copyright Law is a pre/co-requisite
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes 25% of class grade. FOR THE FIRST CLASS - Bring 2 legal pads and pen and highlighter to class. You may be asked from time to time to put away your computer. In-class drafting exercises will be held and although not graded will count towards participation points.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Environmental Law



SLN #: 14981
Course Prefix: LAW-631
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Wolf

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Evidence



SLN #: 12695
Course Prefix: LAW-605
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Depianto

Course Description:
Evidence covers the basic rules that govern the admissibility of evidence in civil and criminal trial proceedings. The primary focus is on how the Federal Rules of Evidence operate in practice, with some attention to areas in which the Arizona Rules of Evidence differ from the Federal Rules. The course is taught by the problem method, with occasional simulations designed to illustrate how litigators deal with witness testimony and other forms of evidence at trial. This is a complex and difficult subject, but one that most practicing lawyers -- including non-litigators -- need to know; and it would be an especially tough subject to try to learn from scratch from a bar review course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Evidence



SLN #: 26240
Course Prefix: LAW-605
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Plunkett

Course Description:
Evidence covers the basic rules that govern the admissibility of evidence in civil and criminal trial proceedings. The primary focus is on how the Federal Rules of Evidence operate in practice, with some attention to areas in which the Arizona Rules of Evidence differ from the Federal Rules. The course is taught by the problem method, with occasional simulations designed to illustrate how litigators deal with witness testimony and other forms of evidence at trial. This is a complex and difficult subject, but one that most practicing lawyers -- including non-litigators -- need to know; and it would be an especially tough subject to try to learn from scratch from a bar review course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Externship



SLN #: 12696
Course Prefix: LAW-785
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-12
Instructor(s): Barnes

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-12
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Fact Investigation II



SLN #: 12687
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 2-3
Instructor(s): Bartels

Course Description:
Fact Investigation II will focus on witness interviewing, including “ordinary” fact witnesses, expert witnesses, and some specialized situations (such as children and time-limited interviews). There will be some group meetings, but much of the work will involve simulated witness interviews aimed at developing skills.

The class will be divided into two groups: (1) students who have taken Fact Investigation I, and (2) those who have not. Group (1) will take the class for 2 credits, and they will not be required to attend any group sessions or do any simulated interviews for the first 3-4 weeks of the semester. Group (2) will take the class for 3 credits, and they will spend the first 3-4 weeks on the basics of witness interviewing.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2-3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: No
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: No
Participation Points: 60% of grade
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: no unexcused absences
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Family Law



SLN #: 12689
Course Prefix: LAW-612
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Pontrelli

Course Description:
The law of marriage and divorce is the primary focus of this course. This includes the law governing entry into marriage, the legal consequences of being married, and the dissolution of the marital status. Topics include: the division of property, spousal maintenance and child support, child custody arrangements, antenuptial and separation agreements, and jurisdictional issues. To the extent time permits, non-traditional families are also considered, including marriage between same-sex partners, the rights and obligations of unmarried cohabitants, and the establishment of paternity rights and obligations. Relevant Arizona Statutes are referred to throughout the course where appropriate as examples, but the course is not limited to Arizona law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Family Law



SLN #: 26241
Course Prefix: LAW-612
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Ellman

Course Description:
The law of marriage and divorce is the primary focus of this course. This includes the law governing entry into marriage, the legal consequences of being married, and the dissolution of the marital status. Topics include: the division of property, spousal maintenance and child support, child custody arrangements, antenuptial and separation agreements, and jurisdictional issues. To the extent time permits, non-traditional families are also considered, including marriage between same-sex partners, the rights and obligations of unmarried cohabitants, and the establishment of paternity rights and obligations. Relevant Arizona Statutes are referred to throughout the course where appropriate as examples, but the course is not limited to Arizona law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Preparation adn attendance is expected
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Federal Criminal Practice & Procedure



SLN #: 12715
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 009
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sands;Wilkinson

Course Description:
This is a clinical class that teaches fundamental federal practice and procedure. The paradigm uses a simulated federal criminal case. Half of the class will act as prosecutors throughout the class; the other half, of course, will be defense attorneys. The case will begin with the arrest of the defendant, and culminate in a trial at the end of the semester. We will separately simulate federal sentencing procedures.

This is a hands-on class intended to get students on their feet. Attendance and class participation is required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence and Criminal Procedure are encouraged
Limited Enrollment Number: 18
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Federal Income Taxation



SLN #: 12714
Course Prefix: LAW-606
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Chodorow

Course Description:
The Federal income tax touches virtually every aspect of modern American life. For practicing lawyers, a basic understanding of the structure and vocabulary of the tax code is critical. This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and issues in taxation, focusing primarily on the taxation of individuals. Coursework will include review of specific code provisions, administrative materials, and important cases. It is the prerequisite for all other tax courses. Problems are assigned for each class, and students are expected to have done these problems and come prepared to discuss them. Class participation counts for 10% of the final grade.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Participation Points: Yes, see course description
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is required
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Federal Indian Law II



SLN #: 17748
Course Prefix: LAW-704
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Clinton

Course Description:
This course surveys legal issues surrounding the ownership and development of Indian lands and resources. Included in that survey are issues regarding treaty rights, property rights, water rights, hunting and fishing rights, natural resources development, and environmental issues in Indian Country. This course does not require a working knowledge of the jurisdictional questions surveyed in Federal Indian Law I, although some background, either from that course or review of William Canby, American Indian Law in a Nutshell is helpful.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Maybe
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Paper or In-Class Presentation: for writers
Participation Points: Yes - see syllabus
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: see syllabus
Online Course Site: Blackboard




First Amendment



SLN #: 18184
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 024
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Weinstein

Course Description:
The first few sessions will be devoted to reading basic material on free speech as well as recently decided Supreme Court decisions on the subject. The seminar will then cover topics in free speech to be selected by the class and the instructor. We may also spend a session or two on the Religion Clauses of the First Amendment.

Sessions at the end of the semester will be devoted to discussions of drafts or outlines of student papers.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Prerequisite: Con Law II strongly recommended
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Foreign Relations Law



SLN #: 17833
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 015
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Gartner

Course Description:
The course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines related to the foreign relations of the United States. It will analyze the distribution of foreign relations powers between the Executive, the Congress, and the Courts. The course will also cover topics including the status of treaties and other types of international agreements, the role of the states in foreign relations, and recent developments in foreign relations law.

NOTE: Students will have the option of either writing a paper, or taking a final exam.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Fundamentals of Contract Law (MLS Students Only)



SLN #: 12721
Course Prefix: LAW-598
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Chesler

Course Description:
This online course will explore the fundamental principles of contract law under the common-law and Uniform Commercial Code statutory provisions. The focus will be on issues of contract formation and interpretation, defenses to enforcement, warranties and conditions, and remedies for breach of contract.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes - Online
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Gender & Family Policy



SLN #: 17866
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 017
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Ellman

Course Description:
This seminar will focus on selected topics in family law, gender issues, and family policy that are the subject of current debate in public policy or intellectual forums. While some topics will emphasize traditional legal materials, many of the assigned readings will be taken from other disciplines, such as psychology, demography, economics, public policy and biology.

During approximately the first ten weeks of the semester we will discuss readings assembled by the instructor, and drawn from topics such as these: (1) Changing demographics of who marries, when they marry, and the economics of marriage; (2) Gender relations and gender definition, biology, and evolutionary psychology; (2) How should the law assign parentage in nontraditional situations (assisted reproduction, arrangements between same-sex couples; conflicts between social and biological parentage); (3) Child support and paternal rights (What are the limits of the child support obligation? Why are the rules for identifying men responsible for child support different than the rules for identifying men entitled, as fathers, to access to their child? Are men and women treated differently, and are any differences appropriate?; (4) Child support and custody issues arising from same-sex relationships; (5) How are child support guidelines constructed? Why are there enormous uncollected support arrearages owed to public agencies, and does that make sense? (5) Public policies for addressing household poverty for families with children. (6) Are child custody allocations based exclusively on the child's interests, and should they be? (7) How do American trends in marriage and divorce compare with trends in other countries, and to what extent legal policies affect those trends.

Regular attendance and participation are expected. Rather than require a longer paper reflecting the full three hours’ credit, the instructor may instead require one or two brief written reviews of assigned readings, in combination with a shorter term paper. The final few weeks of the semester will consist of presentations by students on the topic of their main paper for the class.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance expected
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Gideon Fellowship



SLN #: 15026
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 013
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Ames

Course Description:
The Gideon Fellowship for Criminal Defense is a 12-month clinical experience beginning the summer following the completion of the second year of law school. Through the fellowship, a student experiences a progression of various experiences in indigent defense work at both the Office of the Maricopa County Public Defender and the Federal Public Defender’s Office. The fellow is selected through a competitive application process and is formally awarded at the Annual Arizona Public Defender (APDA) conference in June.

For more information visit the fellowship website: http://www.law.asu.edu/gideon or contact Zelda Graham at roselda.graham@asu.edu

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 1
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Health Care Fraud (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 21919
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: A01
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Giancola

Course Description:
This course will meet on Mondays from 5:30 pm - 7:25 pm for six weeks during the semester. The first class will meet on Monday, January 14, and continue through Monday, February 25. The final exam will be administered at 5:30 pm Monday, March 4.

This class will introduce students to the federal laws, regulations, and guidance that have been enacted to combat fraud and abuse in federal health care programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. The topics to be covered include an overview of Medicare, an introduction to the primary civil and criminal fraud statutes, such as the False Claims Act, Anti-Kickback Statute, the Stark Law, fraud and abuse investigations, initiatives, enforcement and prosecution by the government against health care providers, the impact and implications of Qui tam actions, the fraud and abuse provisions contained in recent health care reform legislation (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010), self-disclosure protocols, and practical considerations for defending health care fraud and abuse investigations and cases.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Healthcare Entrepreneurship-Classroom Component



SLN #: 26523
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 029
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Menkhus

Course Description:
Law students interested in health law will be partnered with early-stage Arizona based businesses, to solve problems related to formation, IP issues, compliance and regulatory issues, contracts, leases and licenses. Students will work with in-house counsel or senior leadership in these organizations. Students will learn about and address the challenges encountered while starting an entrepreneurial business. Students attend Professor Menkhus's Innovation Advancement seminar and meet with me in person or by phone weekly.

Students participating in this clinic will work with John Shufeldt, M.D., J.D., a Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law alum and co-founder of NextCare, Inc.

NOTE: This clinic will be divided into two components:
1. two credit hour classroom-based component which will be graded on a numeric or letter scale
2. four credit hour client-focused component which will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

For additional information, contact Dr. John Shufeldt at john.shufeldt@asu.edu

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Directors of the Clinic and the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 5
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Healthcare Entrepreneurship-Client Component



SLN #: 26524
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 028
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Shufeldt

Course Description:
Law students interested in health law will be partnered with early-stage Arizona based businesses, to solve problems related to formation, IP issues, compliance and regulatory issues, contracts, leases and licenses. Students will work with in-house counsel or senior leadership in these organizations. Students will learn about and address the challenges encountered while starting an entrepreneurial business. Students attend Professor Menkhus's Innovation Advancement seminar and meet with me in person or by phone weekly.

Students participating in this clinic will work with John Shufeldt, M.D., J.D., a Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law alum and co-founder of NextCare, Inc.

NOTE: This clinic will be divided into two components:
1. two credit hour classroom-based component which will be graded on a numeric or letter scale
2. four credit hour client-focused component which will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

For additional information, contact Dr. John Shufeldt at john.shufeldt@asu.edu

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Directors of the Clinic and the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 5
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Immigration Law & Policy Clinic



SLN #: 13934
Course Prefix: LAW-778
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Cruz

Course Description:
The Immigration Law & Policy Clinic is a live-client clinic where students represent immigrants, particularly children, in immigration proceedings before the Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly INS), state dependency court, and the immigration courts. The clinic classroom component exposes students to traditional trial techniques (witness examination, brief writing, closing arguments, etc) and training on representation of diverse populations, including units on working with translators, cross-cultural representation, and multi-cultural sensitivities. The clinic's litigation component requires students to work with statutes, cases, and international sources. Students also collaborate with psychologists, social workers, translators, and experts to develop their motions, briefs, and witness examinations. Finally, students engage in community lawyering projects such as community education and policy research. Students should be available either Monday or Friday mornings for court.

This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: As needed for case
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: There are no class pre-requisites and Spanish is NOT required
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 6 - Must fill out questioner available at clinic webpage prior to enrollment
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Independent Study



SLN #: 12686
Course Prefix: LAW-781
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-3
Instructor(s):

Course Description:
A student wishing to pursue independent study or fieldwork for credit must obtain approval of the Dean’s designee and the consent of a faculty member to supervise a proposed project. The faculty member assigns the amount of credit that the proposal justifies. In awarding credit to a student for an independent study paper, a faculty member should require a quantum of work from the student which approximates the amount of work expected from students enrolled in a regular course taken for the same number of credits. Faculty members should set minimum lengths for independent study papers based upon the complexity of the subject, the existing volume of literature on the topic, the number of redrafts required to complete the assignment, and the originality of the student's work product. Although exact guidelines cannot be formulated in awarding credit, past practices indicate that generally a paper of approximately 12,500 – 18,750 words, including footnotes, which has been redrafted one or more times after review by the faculty member, will be required for three credits. Generally, a paper of roughly 8,750 – 12,500 words, including footnotes (with one redraft) should be required for two credits, and normally a minimum of 6,250 words, including footnotes (with one redraft), should be required for one credit.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-3
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Independent Study-Contract Drafting



SLN #: 18448
Course Prefix: LAW-781
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Chesler

Course Description:
This course is open to JD candidates only.

This is the online component to the LAW691 Contract Drafting/Neg Hybrid class.

Interested students should enroll in course # 26472.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: contracts
Limited Enrollment Number: 19
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Indian Law & Taxation



SLN #: 16339
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 016
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Irvine

Course Description:
This course deals with issues of federal, state, and tribal taxation within Indian country. The course will survey the leading cases, statutes and administrative rulings. Transactional problems and tax planning opportunities will also be discussed.

Federal Indian Law I or Federal Income Tax is a prerequisite to this course. Federal Indian Law I provides a general background for the concepts of sovereignty and federal preemption that are more fully developed in this course as specifically applied to tax issues. This course will apply the general concepts to situations that frequently arise for Indian law practioners.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Federal Indian Law I or Federal Income Tax
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Indian Legal Clinic



SLN #: 13932
Course Prefix: LAW-776
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Ferguson-Bohnee

Course Description:
The Indian Legal Clinic provides students with the opportunity to work under the supervision of an experienced faculty supervisor to gain practical experience (1) working on real cases involving issues of tribal law and federal Indian law, and (2) representing real clients in tribal, state, and federal court, as well as in administrative proceedings. The Clinic’s practice is broad: students will have the opportunity to work on civil and criminal cases, and also do policy and transactional work. Clinic students handle all aspects of law practice, including time-keeping; client interviewing and counseling; drafting pleadings, motions, briefs, opinion letters and contracts; appearing in court; conducting discovery; and conducting trials, mediations, and arbitrations. There is also an advanced seminar component of the Clinic based on simulation exercises designed to help students develop trial skills including advanced interviewing, fact investigation, case theory development, client counseling, discovery, negotiation, ADR, and courtroom advocacy. Clinic students participate in weekly staff meetings to discuss pending cases and potential new cases. Attendance at seminars and staff meetings is mandatory. Students are expected to complete 20 hours of Clinic work per week which includes client work, seminar work, and Clinic meetings. Student-attorneys are also required to attend weekly staff meetings. Students will be required to attend trainings outside of regularly-scheduled class throughout the semester. The Clinic is a graded 6-credit course. Enrollment is limited to 6 students and Federal Indian Law I, Civil Procedure, Criminal Law, Professional Responsibility and Evidence are co-requisites--these courses can be taken before enrollment in the Clinic or at the same time. Students are encouraged to take Evidence prior to enrolling in the Indian Legal Clinic. The Indian Legal Clinic is required for students participating in the Indian Law Certificate program. This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Federal Indian Law I, Civil Procedure, Criminal Law, Professional Responsibility and Evidence are all corequisites
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 6
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance required at all seminars and staffings
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Innovation Adv. Legal Clinic (Client Component)



SLN #: 16213
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 008
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Menkhus

Course Description:
The Innovation Advancement Legal Clinic (IALC) is a transactional clinical offering for law students at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. IALC is part of a multi-disciplinary program, the Innovation Advancement Program (IAP), in which law students can partner with graduate students from business, engineering, and the sciences to assist emerging technology companies with their start up efforts. IALC students assist entrepreneurial clients with legal issues, such as business entity formation, contract drafting, IP, IP audits, and/or employment law. Furthermore, classroom topics also discuss raising capital, valuation techniques, sources of capital, commercialization strategies, and other topics that technology entrepreneurs and innovators experience in the infancy of their ventures.

This is an opportunity to get “hands on” legal experience, work with real clients, and learn from students and professionals with varied backgrounds and experiences. A technology background IS NOT REQUIRED nor critical to success in the course. Either Business Organizations or Intro to IP are pre/co-requisite courses for the clinic.

NOTE: This clinic will be divided into two components:
1. two credit hour classroom-based component which will be graded on a numeric or letter scale
2. four credit hour client-focused component which will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

The IAP is now accepting applications for the Spring 2013 semester. Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Innovation Advancement Legal Clinic



SLN #: 13933
Course Prefix: LAW-777
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Menkhus

Course Description:
The Innovation Advancement Legal Clinic (IALC) is a transactional clinical offering for law students at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. IALC is part of a multi-disciplinary program, the Innovation Advancement Program (IAP), in which law students can partner with graduate students from business, engineering, and the sciences to assist emerging technology companies with their start up efforts. IALC students assist entrepreneurial clients with legal issues, such as business entity formation, contract drafting, IP, IP audits, and/or employment law. Furthermore, classroom topics also discuss raising capital, valuation techniques, sources of capital, commercialization strategies, and other topics that technology entrepreneurs and innovators experience in the infancy of their ventures.

This is an opportunity to get “hands on” legal experience, work with real clients, and learn from students and professionals with varied backgrounds and experiences. A technology background IS NOT REQUIRED nor critical to success in the course. Either Business Organizations or Intro to IP are pre/co-requisite courses for the clinic.

NOTE: This clinic will be divided into two components:
1. two credit hour classroom-based component which will be graded on a numeric or letter scale
2. four credit hour client-focused component which will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

The IAP is now accepting applications for the Spring 2013 semester. Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Intellectual Property



SLN #: 17739
Course Prefix: LAW-664
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Fellmeth

Course Description:
This course will survey the laws conventionally grouped as “intellectual property,” with a focus on patents, copyrights, and trademarks. The policy rationales for each body of law will be explored. The course will be particularly relevant for two types of students: (i) those who are unsure they want to specialize in IP and want a general introduction, and (ii) those who do not have room in the schedules to take all of the upper-level offerings here at ASU.

The course is not appropriate for students that have already taken the upper level courses in Copyright, Trademark, and Patents and students who have taken these offerings may be withdrawn.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




International Business Transactions



SLN #: 14974
Course Prefix: LAW-768
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Fellmeth

Course Description:
An introduction to the U.S., foreign and international law regulating cross-border business transactions and to the structure of cross-border business deals. Topics include: regulation of imports and exports of goods and services; foreign direct investment; international corporate formation, mergers, acquisitions and reorganizations; international protection of intellectual property; international employment law issues; cross-border lending; international antitrust; and international dispute resolution options. Because international transactions are becoming an increasingly important part of every kind of transactional and administrative law, this course should prove useful to most students who intend to practice in any field of corporate, commercial, or regulatory law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Contracts and Business Organizations
Final Exam Given: Yes
Paper or In-Class Presentation: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




International Contracts



SLN #: 17737
Course Prefix: LAW-614
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Calleros

Course Description:
This course will explore the laws applicable to international contractual relations, focusing heavily on the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods. Along the way, we will touch on a few other topics, such as choice of law rules, a comparison of selected UCC sections with CISG provisions, and a comparison of the contract law of selected foreign nations with that in the United States. The final grade will be based primarily on a final exam and secondarily on possible periodic quizzes and possible small-group research papers.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: Possible periodic quizzes
Participation Points: Prof. reserves discretion, as allowed by policies
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




International Income Tax



SLN #: 26479
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 025
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Kirschenbaum

Course Description:
The course will analyze the income tax law of the United States as it relates to the taxation of international transactions, including the role of income tax treaties to which the United States is a party, with emphasis on U.S. jurisdictional issues, taxation of foreign investments into the United States, the foreign tax credit, transfer pricing, taxation of transfers to foreign affiliates, and anti-deferral mechanism such as the controlled foreign corporation regime.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




International Indigenous Rights



SLN #: 26507
Course Prefix: LAW-719
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Tsosie

Course Description:
This course focuses on the international law and comparative law dimensions of protecting the rights of indigenous peoples. We will study the framework for international human rights law through structures such as the United Nations and the Organization of American States, and the various conventions and treaties that govern international human rights. We will focus on the norms of international human rights law that underlie concepts such as self-determination and cultural survival, and examine their use by indigenous groups in contemporary actions in international forums. We will then look at the law of New Zealand, Australia and Canada to examine the legal rights and status of Native peoples in those countries. We will compare those legal structures to that which exists within the United States by evaluating the treatment of indigenous rights to land, resources, and aspects of culture, such as language and cultural property.

This is a graded seminar. There is a take-home writing assignment and a 15 page research paper. Students wishing to complete their Graduation Writing requirement will be allowed to enroll in a one credit independent study. Attendance is mandatory.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes, take-home assignment AND a research paper
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is mandatory, no more than 2 absences are allowed.
Online Course Site: None




International Law of Armed Conflict



SLN #: 18054
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 021
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Bodansky

Course Description:
A course on the international law governing armed conflicts. The course will cover both the jus ad bellum (or international law relating to the initiation of armed conflict) as well as the jus in bello (or international law relating to how hostilities, once initiated, may be conducted). It will address traditional wars between countries as well more recent developments, including internal armed conflicts, the war on terrorism, the use of drones and other autonomous weapons systems, and cyberware, and will conclude with a brief discussion of the international criminal law respecting war crimes.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: Yes (with paper option)
Participation Points: Up to 20% of the grade
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Int'l Law of Trade



SLN #: 16256
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 011
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Abbott

Course Description:

In the increasingly global market, understanding issues of international trade is vital for the modern business attorney. The body of law administered by the World Trade Organization is an essential component of trade law, and is important to understanding more specific national measures including customs duties and trade remedies, as well as regional trade agreements such as NAFTA.

This course will cover economic and political theories of trade; the WTO as an organization; the major principles and exceptions of international trade law; and the status and future outlook of the current round of global trade negotiations. We will also consider how the rules of trade law interact with other important issues, such as protection of the environment and human health.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: None
Special Withdrawal Course: No
Limited Enrollment Number: N/A
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: No mid-term
Participation Points: 10% of grade
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Per school policy
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Intro to Corp Tax Law



SLN #: 23275
Course Prefix: LAW-316
Course Section: A01
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sage

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Intro to Corp Tax Law



SLN #: 26346
Course Prefix: LAW-316
Course Section: B01
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sage

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Intro to Int'l Comparative Law



SLN #: 27205
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: D02
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Chamboredon

Course Description:
Dr Anthony Chamboredon
Senior lecturer at Paris Descartes University
Faculty coordinator for European and International affairs
Director of the Master Degree « Common law and Comparative law
President of the Franco-Chinese Association for Legal studies and Researches
Member of the « Maurice Hauriou Research Center
Member of the « Société de législation comparée Senior Lecturer at Science Po Paris

The class will meet January 3, 4, 7, and 8 from 9:00 am - 12:15pm. A two hour written exam will be administered at 9:00 am on Wednesday, January 9th

INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE LAW
Legal cultures and globalisation Classically, an introduction to “comparative law” is aimed at describing various legal systems of the world. Such a project may seem rather utopian, and this is the reason why “comparatists” have never received much contemplation from their colleagues. Very often the comparatist stereotype is that of a “library rat”, lost in conceptual considerations which don’t really matter to most people, either because they are unrealistic and not taken seriously, or because his hypotheses are so specific that they are unverifiable or so “general” that they have no practical value. Despite a renewed interest in comparative law studies, the endoxa of lawyers remains sceptical and has little consideration for comparative law as a legal discipline. Actually, comparative methodology is belittled by asserting that “we always compare things, civil law, contractual law, acquisitive prescriptions; all these legal institutions or techniques do exist, but there is no comparative law as such.” Despite comparatitist’ efforts to turn ‘comparative law’ into an autonomous scientific discipline, the current dominant viewpoint is that it is only a methodology applied to law, nothing more; however, this is already not in all bad!

Our introduction might appear more realistic if we do limit our aim to the definition of comparative methodology itself applied to law. Right away, we discover all the interest and specificity of this methodology, and its great relevance in our increasingly “mediatised” world of globalisation. Such an interest is not limited to an acquisition of knowledge regarding other legal cultures, it also concerns their recognition, the recognition of their differences, of their diversity; which itself invites us to be aware of the diversity within our own legal culture, our own legal identity.

Thus, comparative methodology applied to law helps us to reflect upon dialectic links between two phenomena, which may initially seem mutually excluding each other: the diversity of legal cultures and the law globalisation. In a problematic way, should we consider the present process of globalisation simply as a global trend towards uniformity that inevitability should entail an acculturation of local legal identities? - While observing phenomena of circulation and reception of legal models throughout the world, comparatists may offer an heuristic clarification regarding this debate between the preservation of legal identities and globalisation, between legal diversity and legal identity, the local law and the global law.

In order to offer some elements of analysis, our introductory seminars are divided into five progressive steps, each one of which represents a contributory element of the comparative methodology applied to law and participate to the debate on legal cultures and globalization:

I – Meanings of Comparison in law
II – Functions of Comparison in law
III – Methods of comparison in law
IV – Fates of Comparison in law
V – Applications of Comparison in law

Day I - Meanings
Reading Assignments:
- Kahn-Freund, Otto, "Comparative Law as an Academic Subject" (1966) 82 LQR 40
To go further:
- Zweigert, Konrad and Hein Kötz (Tony Weir, trans.) Introduction to Comparative Law. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press, 3rd ed., 1998.
- Schlesinger, R. Comparative law, Mineola, N.Y. : Foundation Press, 1998

Day II - Functions
Reading Assignments:
- Kahn-Freund, Otto,"On Uses and Misuses of Comparative Law", (1974) 37 MLR 1
- "The Aims of Comparative Law" de H. Patrick Glenn in J. Smits, ed., Elgar Encyclopedia of Comparative Law. Edward Elgar, 2006
To go further:
- Farber, D.A.,"The Hermeneutic Tourist : Statutory Interpretation in Comparative Perspective", (1996) 81 Cornell Law Review 513
- Atiyah, P.S., and R.S. Summers. Form and Substance in Anglo-American Law: a comparative study of legal reasoning, legal theory and legal institutions. (Oxford: Clarendon, 1987)

Day III - Methods
Reading Assignments:
- Reitz, John. "How to Do Comparative Law." (1998) 46 American Journal of Comparative Law (4) 617
- Orucu, E., 2007, "'Methodological Aspects Of Comparative Law'", European Journal of Law Reform, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 29-42.
To go further:
- Orucu, E., 2009, Comparative Law, The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal history, Katz, Stanley N, New York.

Day IV - Fates
Reading Assignment:
- Walther Hug, The History of Comparative Law, Harvard Law Review, Vol. 45, No. 6 (Apr., 1932), pp. 1027-1070
To go further:
-.Fletcher, George. "Comparative Law as a Subversive Discipline." (1998) 46 American Journal of Comparative Law (4) 683.

Day V – Applications
Reading Assignment:
- Lasser, Mitchel. "Judicial (Self-) Portraits: Judicial Discourse in the French Legal System." (1995) 104 Yale Law Journal 1325
- Legrand, P. "European Legal Systems are not Converging" 45 (1996) ICLQ 52
To go further:
- Sacco, R. "Legal Formants: a Dynamic Approach to Comparative Law (part 1)." (1991) 39 American Journal of Comparative Law 1
- Glenn, H. Patrick. Legal Traditions of the World: Sustainable Diversity in Law. New York: Oxford University Press, 2nd ed., 2004.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Intro to Legislation & Administrative Law



SLN #: 26522
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: D03
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Askland

Course Description:
This class will be held in Washington DC, and is part of the DC Externship Program. Class will meet for nine days from January 7th to the 17th with a two hour exam on the 18th. The class will meet from 9:00 am to noon.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Judicial Remedies



SLN #: 12708
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Hessick

Course Description:
This course canvasses the types of remedies that a court may award for civil wrongs. Particular attention will be give to injunctions and their enforcement. The course will also consider the advantages and disadvantages of the various types of remedies from the perspectives of economic efficiency, fairness, corrective justice, and the needs of the client.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Jurimetrics Journal



SLN #: 12709
Course Prefix: LAW-771
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-3
Instructor(s): Chodorow

Course Description:
Web Site: http://www.law.asu.edu/jurimetrics

Jurimetrics, The Journal of Law, Science, and Technology, published quarterly, is the journal of the American Bar Association Section of Science and Technology and the Center for the Study of Law, Science, and Technology of the ASU College of Law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Law and Psychology



SLN #: 15099
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Demaine

Course Description:
This seminar provides students with an overview of classic and modern research in the field of law and psychology. Students should obtain an understanding of how psychology has been and could be used to inform law and social policy in a variety of civil and criminal domains.

No background in statistics or experimental methodology is required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Law Journal



SLN #: 12697
Course Prefix: LAW-770
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-3
Instructor(s): Hessick

Course Description:
The purpose of the Journal is to produce, edit, and publish high quality works of legal scholarship. The operational and editorial functions of the Journal are run by students. Participation on Law Journal is hard but rewarding work. For those eligible, the journal provides one of the finest avenues for legal education thus far developed. Its work contributes to the student's intellectual advancement, to the development of law, to the legal profession, and to the stature of the law school.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Law, Accounting, and Finance



SLN #: 12710
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Friedman

Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce the basic elements of financial accounting to attorneys. This course will present the “Fundamentals of Accounting” as well as the “Accounting Principles” that form the foundation for current day accounting. The students will gain an understanding of Financial Statements, Financial Statement and Auditing reporting requirements and a general overview of the entities that set the rules, ethics and standards for the accounting profession. The course is divided into three (3) sections consisting of the introduction of accounting, forensic and valuation issues and the examination and cross-examination of accountants

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Law, Culture & Community



SLN #: 25777
Course Prefix: LAW-294
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Herbert

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Law, Science & Technology



SLN #: 26482
Course Prefix: LAW-703
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Marchant

Course Description:
Nearly every field in the practice of law now involves some interaction between law and science and technology -- whether it be litigation, administrative law, environmental law, constitutional law, telecommunications law, health law, corporate law, employment law, contract law, property law and many others. Lawyers who are knowledgeable and comfortable in dealing with the scientific and technological aspects underlying many legal issues are in great demand at law firms, companies, government agencies and other providers of legal services. This survey course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the various ways in which the legal system interacts with science and technology, and the skills and knowledge necessary to address such issues. The course will examine the interactions and conflicts between law and science using a series of illustrative case studies addressing current issues such as the internet, cloning, air pollution, the Daubert standard for admission of scientific evidence, tobacco research, the Microsoft antitrust case, electric vehicles, digital copyright, genetically modified foods, nanotechnology, anti-terrorism technology, global warming and privacy. No special background or expertise in science or technology is required to benefit from this course. Students can elect to take a take-home exam or write a research paper (20-30 pp.) for the course. This course qualifies as a “core course” for the LS&I Certificate program.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Optional
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Students can choose to complete a research paper or take-home final exam.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 12693
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Carter

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 12699
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Carter

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 12701
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Chesler

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 12703
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Langenfeld

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Two graded papers, plus various ungraded assignments
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Legal Method
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Two oral arguments
Participation Points: Per College policy
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 12740
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Langenfeld

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Two graded papers, plus various ungraded assignments.
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Legal Method
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Two oral arguments
Participation Points: Per College policy
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 12720
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Holst

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Legal Method and Writing
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 16202
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Holst

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 21752
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 008
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Noreuil

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Advocacy



SLN #: 21753
Course Prefix: LAW-524
Course Section: 009
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Noreuil

Course Description:
This two-credit course builds on the skills learned in the first semester Legal Method and Writing course. The principal focuses of this course are to teach students the basics of: 1) persuasive writing; 2) oral advocacy; and 3) proper legal citation format. In addition, this course reinforces legal analysis, organizational skills, and basic legal research skills.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legislative Externship



SLN #: 12729
Course Prefix: LAW-785
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Bender

Course Description:
Legislative internship students are selected in a competitive process administered by the Career Services office at the College of Law. Students should contact Career Services for admission forms and information. Legislative externs apply and are selected in the fall semester. There are 6 intern positions at the Arizona Legislature for spring 2011: House Rules (2), Senate Rules (2), House Democrat Staff (1), and Legislative Council (1. Students from all the three Arizona law schools apply for the positions. The only partisan position is the House Democrat. Students are placed in the positions and cannot choose where they want to be placed.

All Legal Legislative Interns earn 6 pass/fail credit hours. To receive these credits, a student must work 60 hours for each credit earned resulting in a total of 360 hours of work. Students, who begin the internship on or about January 14, will work for 15 weeks including Spring Break, and complete the internship around April 21. Students who start and finish on dates other than those described will adjust their schedules so that they complete the required 360 hours of work for the 6 credits earned.

When contemplating applying for a Legislative Internship, be sure to note that the College of Law will recognize no more that 12 credits of externship credit, including the 6 Legal Legislative Internship credits. If you do not have the appropriate number of credits (6) available to you, you will not be allowed to participate with the legal Legislative Internship program.

Among other opportunities, legislative interns work closely with legislative counsel to analyze proposed state legislation for constitutionality. It is strongly recommended that legislative intern students take Arizona Constitutional Law as either a pre-requisite or a co- requisite. In addition to the on-site work experience provided at the Arizona legislature, an academic component of the internship is provided by Professor Paul Bender at the College of Law. Professor Bender meets with legislative internship students periodically throughout the semester to review their work and discuss their experiences. Professor Bender will contact the spring intern students by e-mail to set up the first meeting of the academic component.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Lisa Foundation Patent Law Clinic



SLN #: 16211
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Gross

Course Description:
The Lisa Foundation Patent Law Clinic provides students with hands-on experience in real-world patent prosecution, licensing and litigation. The clinic is open to students having a background in science and engineering who are qualified to sit for the Patent Bar exam as well as students with a non-technical background who have a strong interest in patent law. Faculty will attempt to match students’ areas of technical expertise with available projects.

Students who have already completed the three-credit Patent Licensing & Enforcement course will enroll in the clinic for three credits. Students who have not completed Patent Licensing & Enforcement are required to enroll in the three-credit version of this course which is taught every other Fall semester (this course will be offered in the Fall 2013 semester) by Steven Lisa and other attorneys who work with Steven G. Lisa, Ltd.

During semesters in which the 3-credit version of this course is not offered, students who have not already completed the course will be required to enroll in a one-credit course which consists of a lecture-based version of the material covered in Patent Licensing & Enforcement and will be held on Friday immediately following the clinic meeting.

Additional recommended pre or co-requisites include Patent Law or Patent Preparation & Prosecution. The clinic will be supervised by active practitioner, Michelle Gross (private practice).

Additionally, attorneys affiliated with the Law Offices of Steven G. Lisa, Ltd. will contribute to instruction. The 3-credit version of the clinic will be graded and the fourth credit (Patent Licensing & Enforcement course, when offered in place of the separate 3-credit Patent Licensing & Enforcement course) will be pass/fail.

This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Patent Licensing & Enforcement is a required pre or co-requisite; Patent Law or Patent Prosecution are pre or co-requisites
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Lisa Foundation Patent Law Clinic (Patent Licensing)



SLN #: 16212
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Gross

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Mediation & Settlement Advocacy



SLN #: 21909
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 027
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Meyerson

Course Description:
Mediation and judicial settlement conferences are now the mainstream form of dispute resolution. Every attorney will participate in some form of settlement process. This highly interactive seminar will offer students practical and theoretical training in the mediation and settlement of civil disputes. The course is taught through a case study in which actors play the role of parties to a dispute. The students will interview the clients, draft a mediation memorandum, meet with the clients to prepare for a mediation, and then actually represent the clients during a mediation. In addition, the students will study mediation and settlement advocacy theory as well as legal issues relevant to mediation and settlement.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Prior course in Alternative Dispute Resolution
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Mediation Clinic



SLN #: 12733
Course Prefix: LAW-775
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Hinshaw

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




National Security Law



SLN #: 26473
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 021
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Gordon

Course Description:
After 9/11, the Country declared “War on Terror.” However, unlike our prior wars, this war has no geographic boundaries or temporal limits. The “enemy” is not a nation but a cause. The enemy troops come from many countries, including the United State. This seminar explores some of the legal issues on how we conduct this “war.” At the foundation, we look at the major constitutional, statutory, cases and treaty provisions that set the current “rules of engagement.” This includes the respective appropriate roles of the President, Congress and the courts. We will explore the basic legal question of our we dealing with enemies, common criminals or both.

Much of the course will built around the lessons we have learned or haven’t learned from Guantanamo.

There are also myriad of operational questions. How and where do we capture, detain, and interrogate terrorists or suspected terrorists? How do we gather information? What is the role of FISA and NSA? How does domestic surveillance differ from overseas data gathering? How do we distinguish between domestic criminals, enemy combatants and illegal enemy combatants? How do we distinguish between war enemies who may be subject to trial in military commissions and domestic terrorists who are subject to traditional criminal proceedings? Are military commissions legitimate in this context and how do they differ from article III proceedings?

Ultimately we are faced with the question of whether this is really war, where are the boundaries between war and crime, do traditional notions of the law of war even apply?

The course materials will be handouts including cases, constitutional provisions, statutes, treaty excerpts, major speeches and policy papers, current headlines and articles and references to much of the current literature on these difficult subjects. There will not be any assigned textbook.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Natural Law Seminar



SLN #: 12728
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 011
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): White

Course Description:

This seminar will examine the philosophical foundations of the so-called natural-law tradition and possible implications of that tradition with respect to moral, political, and legal issues. The key idea of this tradition is that the combination of (a) an objective human nature or ‘function’ (‘ergon’, in the Greek) and (b) human participation in (practical) rationality should have moral, political, legal consequences. We will explore the ancient Greek (particularly Aristotelian and Stoic) origins of this tradition, its adaptation to a Christian world-view, its development in medieval scholastic thought, and its transformation (arguably into something quite different) within the ‘new natural law’ and ‘natural rights’ tradition of the seventeenth century. Finally, we will consider one or two contemporary attempts to develop this tradition and to apply the natural-law perspective to political and legal issues.
Texts:
Cicero. The Republic and the Laws, ed., ed. Jonathan Powell, trans. Niall Rudd. Oxford University Press, 1998. ISBN-13 978-0192832368
Aquinas, St. Thomas. Treatise on Law. Hackett Publishing Co., 2000. ISBN 0872205487 Paperback
Pufendorf, Samuel. On the Duty of Man and Citizen, ed. James Tully, trans. Michael Silverthorne. Cambridge University Press, 1991. ISBN 0521359805 Paperback.
Locke, John. The Second Treatise of Government, ed. C. B. Macpherson. Hackett Publishing Co., 1980. ISBN-13 9780915144860 Paperback.
Finnis, John. Natural Law and Natural Rights, 2nd edition. Oxford University Press, 2011. ISBN-13 9780199599141 Paperback.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: 'Directed' paper in lieu of final examination
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: Take-home midterm will be given if there is sufficient student interest.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Negotiation



SLN #: 12718
Course Prefix: LAW-733
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Hinshaw

Course Description:
This course examines all aspects of the negotiation process. Students will learn the principles and skills associated with interest-based negotiation by participating in a series of simulation exercises, both inside and outside of class. The simulations involve negotiations in a wide variety of actions and will require substantial out-of-class preparation. The reading materials for the course include both theoretical literature and practice focused articles, and the class culminates in an extensive out-of-class negotiation simulation. Additionally, the class includes $75 in associated fees which cover payment for class simulations and access to an on-line negotiation tool.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 24 maximum
Final Exam Given: No
Participation Points: 15% of grade
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: class attendance required
Online Course Site: None




Neuroscience, Ethics & Law



SLN #: 12716
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 010
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Grey

Course Description:
Advances in the rapidly developing field of neuroscience have allowed scientists to develop new techniques in investigating the brain activity that underlies cognitive phenomena. We will look at ways in which these advances challenge the law both directly (such as changing the common law definition of death from the cardio-pulmonary standard to brain death) and indirectly (such as changing our views on mental retardation and criminal culpability.) Thus, we will examine how the various emerging neuroscientific findings and technologies could or should affect such topics as moral reasoning, criminal culpability, lie detection, bias detection, cognitive enhancement, and punishment. The first part of the course will explore the neurological definition of personhood, as well as the implications of monitoring and predicting human behavior. The second part of the course will focus on efforts to manipulate or modify the brain. We will also explore some of the challenging questions raised by the increasing use of brain scans as evidence in the courtroom.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Individual paper and a group project
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 18 law students & 18 graduate students
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Patent Litigation



SLN #: 12712
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Halaby

Course Description:
This is a practical course, drawn on real world litigation experience, addressing key issues in patent litigation. We will cover, at a minimum, pre-litigation issues including pre-filing investigation and identifying proper parties; jurisdiction, venue, and pleadings; disclosure and discovery; privilege issues; experts; dispositive motions, pretrial, and trial; claim construction; infringement and non-infringement; invalidity; unenforceability; remedies; appeal; and reexamination and reissue. We will survey applicable provisions of Titles 28 and 35 of the United States Code, as well as the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. We also will cover significant patent litigation changes wrought by 2011’s America Invents Act. Reading assignments and lectures will be designed to help students gain an understanding of what the real world practice of law is like. Prior completion of, or at least concurrent enrollment in, Civil Procedure is strongly encouraged. Prior completion of, or at least concurrent enrollment in, Evidence and an introductory course addressing patent law is desirable, but not required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Prior completion of, or at least concurrent enrollment in, Evidence and an introductory course addressing patent law is desirable, but not required.
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Patent Preparation & Prosecution



SLN #: 16255
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Noblitt

Course Description:
The course is targeted at teaching the fundamental knowledge and skills required for preparing patent applications for filing at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) and pursuing them to issuance. The patent practitioner must be prepared to interview the inventor, learn the technology, and prepare the patent application. Further, the patent practitioner negotiates with the examiner and prosecutes the application. Clients expect the practitioner to provide useful counsel on how to pursue the application, options for appealing or otherwise overcoming adverse decisions, and protecting the technology from domestic and foreign competition. The course is designed to train the patent practitioner to understand the patent options for various technologies, clients, and situations. Students learn the basics of drafting patent applications, pursuing the patent application through the PTO process, meeting adverse decisions from the PTO, and maintaining the issued patent. The course also addresses anticipating litigation issues, protecting developing technologies, and pursuing patents abroad.”

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Patent Law or Intellectual Property are recommended
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Post-Conviction Clinic



SLN #: 12700
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Popko

Course Description:
Year Long Course - Students enrolled in the Post-Conviction Clinic during the Fall 2012 semester, will enroll in an additional 3 credits for the Spring 2013 semester.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Privacy



SLN #: 26508
Course Prefix: LAW-724
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Coleman

Course Description:
This seminar will examine the origins and modern structure of the laws that protect information privacy, with a particular focus on the ways in which the law is responding to new information and communication technologies. The course will begin by tracing the historical roots of the right to privacy in American law. It will then examine a range of current privacy law issues, including tensions between privacy protections and the legitimate interests of media and law enforcement, as well issues relating to medical and financial privacy, and the protection of privacy at home, school and in the workplace.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Privacy, Gov't & Emerging Technologies



SLN #: 18069
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 023
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Askland

Course Description:
This course takes place in D.C. The class will meet on Wednesdays from 6:30 pm - 9:25 pm. This course will identify the sources for privacy protections in tort, statutory and Constitutional law. It then focus upon contemporary challenges arising from (1) government policies and (2) emerging technologies, in particular the increased use and functionality of electronic communications, encryptography and rapidly improving biotechnologies.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Professional Legal Writing (MLS & LLM)



SLN #: 17747
Course Prefix: LAW-596
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Detwiller Digiacomo

Course Description:
This course is for MLS and LLM Students ONLY

This course aims to help non-lawyers learn how to organize a legal research project by analyzing the facts and identifying the issues involved, determining the research tools needed to correctly investigate the legal problem, and systematically using these tools to strengthen and support the desired legal argument. Students will complete research and writing exercises. Students most likely will prepare one memorandum of law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Professional Responsibility



SLN #: 12706
Course Prefix: LAW-638
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sturr;Stanton

Course Description:
This course will examine the law of lawyering with significant focus on the ethical rules by which attorneys should conduct themselves in their various professional roles. The course will also examine the common and statutory law applicable to lawyers. The ultimate objective of the course is to give students both a working knowledge of the law governing lawyers and the practice of law and legal ethics and an appreciation for the difficulties and challenges that the professional currently confronts.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 35
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Professional Responsibility



SLN #: 12732
Course Prefix: LAW-638
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Lynk

Course Description:
This course will examine the law of lawyering with significant focus on the ethical rules by which attorneys should conduct themselves in their various professional roles. The ultimate objective of the course is to give students both a working knowledge of the law governing lawyers and the practice of law and legal ethics and an appreciation for the difficulties and challenges that the professional currently confronts. Students may be expected to participate in in-class simulations and write short reflective paragraphs for on-line posting. Attendance and class participation is required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Professional Responsibility



SLN #: 14982
Course Prefix: LAW-638
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Dahlstedt

Course Description:
This course will examine the law of lawyering with significant focus on the ethical rules by which attorneys should conduct themselves in their various professional roles. The ultimate objective of the course is to give students both a working knowledge of the law governing lawyers and the practice of law and legal ethics and an appreciation for the difficulties and challenges that the professional currently confronts. Students may be expected to participate in in-class simulations and write short reflective paragraphs for on-line posting. Attendance and class participation is required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Property



SLN #: 12688
Course Prefix: LAW-523
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Karjala

Course Description:
This course examines the nature of property within the American legal system, commencing with a study of the fundamental principles of property acquisition and ownership. The course covers common law doctrines of property law, private agreements with respect to property use and acquisition, and the governmental regulation of property through zoning and eminent domain. This is a survey course that will be useful to students in legal practice and it sets the foundation for advanced work in real estate law, real estate construction and development, and condemnation proceedings.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Property



SLN #: 12702
Course Prefix: LAW-523
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Herrera

Course Description:
This course examines the nature of property within the American legal system, commencing with a study of the fundamental principles of property acquisition and ownership. The course covers common law doctrines of property law, private agreements with respect to property use and acquisition, and the governmental regulation of property through zoning and eminent domain. This is a survey course that will be useful to students in legal practice and it sets the foundation for advanced work in real estate law, real estate construction and development, and condemnation proceedings.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Property



SLN #: 16201
Course Prefix: LAW-523
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Kramer

Course Description:
This course examines the nature of property within the American legal system, commencing with a study of the fundamental principles of property acquisition and ownership. The course covers common law doctrines of property law, private agreements with respect to property use and acquisition, and the governmental regulation of property through zoning and eminent domain. This is a survey course that will be useful to students in legal practice and it sets the foundation for advanced work in real estate law, real estate construction and development, and condemnation proceedings.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Property



SLN #: 26590
Course Prefix: LAW-523
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Larson

Course Description:
This course examines the nature of property within the American legal system, commencing with a study of the fundamental principles of property acquisition and ownership. The course covers common law doctrines of property law, private agreements with respect to property use and acquisition, and the governmental regulation of property through zoning and eminent domain. This is a survey course that will be useful to students in legal practice and it sets the foundation for advanced work in real estate law, real estate construction and development, and condemnation proceedings.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Prosecutorial Decision Making and Ethics



SLN #: 16387
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 017
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Charlton

Course Description:
Other than the authority given to a soldier in time of war, few in government have the power of a prosecutor. A prosecutor may methodically and intentionally seek to take the life of another. A prosecutor may seek to remove a person from society, put them in prison, and keep them there until they die. Society gives prosecutors broad discretion. Certainly a prosecutor must follow the rules of law and ethics, but is that all we as a society should ask of a prosecutor? Many decisions made by a prosecutor are guided by ethics, others decisions require that a prosecutor look beyond the rules of ethics. When the rule of law and ethics allow for the death penalty in a specific case, what other considerations may a prosecutor use when determining whether to seek the ultimate penalty? When thousands of crimes occur in a single day, how should a prosecutor determine which cases are deserving of the government's resources? This course will focus on how a prosecutor should exercise his or her discretion. We will begin with the rules of ethics and standard manuals such as the U.S. Attorney's Manual. We will then cover widely accepted guidance for prosecutors such as Justice Jackson's famous speech to U.S. Attorneys and Deputy Attorney General James Comey's writing on the courage to say no. The course will cover a wide variety specific prosecutorial decisions such as District Attorney Michael Nifong's decision to prosecute the Duke Lacrosse players, or U.S. Attorney General Elliot Richardson's refusal to obey President Nixon's order to fire the Watergate Special Prosecutor. The course instructor was a career prosecutor for more than 16 years, serving at the Arizona Attorney General's Office as an Assistant Attorney General, and at the U.S. Attorney's Office as an Assistant U.S. Attorney. He was the U.S. Attorney for the District of Arizona from 2001 to 2007, when he was fired for opposing Attorney General Alberto Gonzales' decision to seek the death penalty in a homicide case. The format for the course will be lecture and group discussion. The course will be graded primarily on a final paper to be submitted by the student. The course is recommended for any student who is considering a practice in criminal law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes, see course description
Participation Points: Yes, see course description
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Public Defender Clinic



SLN #: 12735
Course Prefix: LAW-772
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Lowrance

Course Description:
Students enrolled in the Public Defender Clinic represent indigent clients in felony cases under the close supervision of an experienced public defender. While representing indigent clients, students will receive intensive instruction in client and witness interviewing, all aspects of trial advocacy, sentencing advocacy, handling evidentiary hearings on constitutional issues, as well as in ways to improve their public speaking style. This training occurs in the context of offering quality legal representation to clients of limited financial means in considerable need of assistance.

Students are expected to spend 300 hours in the Clinic during the semester (approximately 30 hours of training and 270 hours of casework). As a general guideline, students are expected to work 20 hours per week. Students participate in a mandatory seminar, with instruction in courtroom advocacy, interviewing and counseling skills, substantive law and court procedure.

The Public Defender Clinic is a graded course (6 credits). Evidence is a pre-requisite. Students must have taken or concurrently be enrolled in Professional Responsibility, Criminal Law and Civil Procedure. Trial Advocacy is not a pre-requisite, but if you have been through this course, the skills are beneficial to students' cases.

One week prior to the start of the semester, students are required to attend a mandatory three-day training session.

This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation. NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence is a pre-requisite. Students must have taken or concurrently be enrolled in Professional Responsibility, Criminal Law and Civil Procedure.
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 5
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Public Health Law and Ethics



SLN #: 16207
Course Prefix: LAW-651
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Hodge Jr.

Course Description:
The protection and preservation of the public health are critical goals of government and the private sector. Equally important is the need to respect individual rights and morals in American society. Public Health Law and Ethics explores the inherent tensions between promoting the public’s health and protecting the legal and ethical rights and interests of individuals. Course objectives are to: (1) assess the structure and functions of the U.S. public health system; (2) explore the roles of government, private sector entities, and individuals in assuring the conditions for people to be healthy through law and policy; and (3) assess legal and ethical conflicts between governmental interests in public health and individual interests in liberty or other protected rights in multiple contexts. These issues will be examined through critical facets of public health theory and practice— e.g., health promotion and communication; public health powers such as immunization, testing, screening, quarantine, and isolation; public health emergencies; obesity prevention; regulation of businesses and professions; and tort litigation for the public’s health. While protecting the public’s health has global dimensions, the focus of the course is on public health law in the United States.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: None, although Health Law and Policy is recommended
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Real Estate & Business Valuation



SLN #: 26471
Course Prefix: LAW-656
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Birnbaum

Course Description:
This course will focus upon the valuation of interests in real property and closely-held businesses. The valuation principles to be examined apply in business and economic damages litigation, private property rights disputes, eminent domain proceedings, family law disputes, securities and insurance actions, and almost every other type of litigation which involves a determination of the value of, or damage to, an interest in real property or in a business enterprise. The same principles apply in a wide range of business transactions including mergers, acquisitions, financing and estate planning. This introductory valuation and damages course is specifically designed for prospective real estate, land use, corporate, tax and trial attorneys who anticipate practice in the real estate or business law fields. With respect to real estate valuation, the entire appraisal process will examined, including the provisions to the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). The three methodologies for valuing interests in real property (cost analysis, sales comparison analysis, and income analysis) will each be explored. Special issues, such as the valuation of leasehold interests will also be discussed. With respect to business valuation (including the valuation of professional practices), the course will examine the different standards of value, the compilation and analysis of necessary financial information, and the different methodologies available to assist in the valuation process. Among the specific methodologies which will be discussed will be the guideline publicly traded company method, the capitalized excess earnings method, and capitalized economic income methods. Discounts for lack of control and lack of marketability will also be discussed. One class session will be devoted to a demonstration courtroom examination of a prominent business valuation expert. No prior accounting or mathematics training is required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Representing Vulnerable Populations



SLN #: 18055
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 022
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Dahlstedt

Course Description:
This seminar is designed to prepare students to represent vulnerable populations. Issues uniquely present in cases involving indigent and underrepresented parties will be covered. Students are expected to think about the systemic problems these populations face and how to enhance justice in the legal system. To prepare students to appear in court, they will receive intensive instruction in client interviewing, counseling, evidence, procedure, and legal ethics. Students will participate in weekly exercises and simulations designed to develop and refine essential litigation skills such as client intake and counseling, direct and cross examination, delivering opening statements and closing arguments, introducing exhibits into evidence and conducting negotiations.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Research Cluster



SLN #:
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section:
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s):

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Ruth V. McGregor Family Protection Clinic



SLN #: 17871
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 019
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Buel

Course Description:
The McGregor Family Protection Clinic combines classroom and experiential learning to teach students holistic legal advocacy. Students fully represent indigent abuse survivors based on intensive instruction in client counseling, evidence, cultural competence, and legal ethics in the context of relevant civil, family, human-rights, and criminal law. The Clinic affords students opportunities to work with abuse victims in varied settings on matters involving orders of protection, custody, divorce, setting aside of judgments, housing, employment, immigration, Indian Law, safety planning, and economic empowerment. Through their direct client advocacy students evaluate and critique current laws, policies and services available to abuse victims.

There will be a two-day orientation before classes start and a weekly, mandatory seminar to discuss overarching themes of social justice lawyering and prepare students to appear in court. Students are fully responsible for all aspects of each case and will have regular meetings with faculty and staff to review case work and discuss litigation strategies. Students are expected to think deeply about the universe of the client’s problems and goals, not just the particular proceeding at hand. The Clinic aims to teach students to be skilled, self-reflective lawyers equipped to litigate and counsel in various fields with an understanding and appreciation for justice lawyering and how to effectuate change in the legal system.

The Clinic is graded (6 credits). Because students will devote 300 hours, approximately 20 hours a week to work at the Clinic, you are not permitted to take another clinic at the same time and should plan to limit outside employment. For more information, and to apply for the clinic go to http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: approval from faculty member required prior to any absence
Online Course Site: None




Sales & Leases of Goods



SLN #: 26468
Course Prefix: LAW-621
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Fitzgerald

Course Description:
This is an advanced business contracts course that studies transactions involving the sale, leasing, and licensing of goods to businesses and consumers. The course examines various types of commercial contracts including emerging issues in electronic contracting and computer related property. Liability of manufacturers, dealers, and other sellers for economic losses caused by product failures is reviewed in depth. Brief treatment is given to parallel issues in international sales contracts. The primary body of law studied is the Uniform Commercial Code, Article 2 and related provisions, but other important commercial contracting statutes are introduced, such as the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act(UETA), the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act(E-SIGN), the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA) and special federal statutes, such as the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act. The course also provides a basic introduction to the Convention on International Sale of Goods (CISG). The legal rules and practice skills covered in this course are fundamental for attorneys who advise clients on business matters and/or engage in litigation for business or consumer interests. There are no prerequisites for the course, and no business experience is needed.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Scientific Evidence



SLN #: 14972
Course Prefix: LAW-649
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Plunkett

Course Description:
This seminar examines the legal principles governing the use of scientific evidence in civil and criminal litigation. It also describes the basic scientific underpinnings of expert testimony from the physical, biological, medical, behavioral, and statistical sciences. Particular attention will be paid to DNA evidence. The course will also focus on problems involving the actual courtroom testimony of experts taken from transcripts of actual trials. This will permit direct and cross examination of experts from various scientific fields who will be appearing during the course. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with all aspects of the scientific expert in the courtroom both on direct and cross examination. In addition, a series of litigation-related research and writing exercises will be assigned. These may take the form of office memoranda, pretrial motions and memoranda of points and authorities, appellate briefs, or court opinions in simulated cases. Grades will be based on the written and oral exercises and answers to problems. These will be critiqued by the instructors, and there will be opportunities for rewriting. Some federal judges and experts will participate in teaching the course and evaluating the exercises.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Secured Transactions



SLN #: 26469
Course Prefix: LAW-622
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Gilman

Course Description:
Many business and consumer transactions depend upon credit. Business and consumer lawyers often must advise clients on how to plan and negotiate such transactions and counsel them on the legal consequences and the rights and remedies available to them. In some cases, credit is "unsecured" -- it is simply the contractual undertaking of the obligor. But in many situations, the creditor will insist that the debt be "secured" by giving the creditor an interest in some property of the debtor. The course on Secured Transactions examines these transactions and introduces students to the main types of financing transactions prevalent today and the key problems that arise in planning and performing such agreements. Understanding the law of secured transactions is essential for attorneys who engage in a business, finance, or corporate transactions practice as well as those who represent parties who sell or finance property of all kinds or who expect to engage in commercial litigation, consumer law, or business transactional planning. The course is taught using the problem method. Students are expected as part of their daily preparation to work out solutions to specific “real life” problems using the statutory materials and text. This course is part of a larger commercial law curriculum, but it is not necessary to have taken any of the other commercial law courses as a prerequisite. No prior business experience is necessary.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Securities Regulation



SLN #: 21734
Course Prefix: LAW-640
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Gubler

Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to the two most important federal securities laws: the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course explores the elaborate disclosure obligations that this country imposes on the distribution and trading of investment securities. Topics to be covered include the preparation of disclosure documents, exemptions from disclosure requirements, the relationship between disclosure obligations and anti-fraud rules, the duties of participants in securities transactions, insider trading and the role of state securities regulators in the overall regulatory scheme.

This course should be of interest to students preparing for corporate practice or work with financial regulatory bodies, but also to those interested in the development of the modern regulatory state, as exemplified by evolution of federal securities laws under the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Business Organizations. Professor will consider on a case by case basis individuals who want to take Securities Regulation but who have not yet taken Business Organizations or are taking it concurrently
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance and preparation are expected
Online Course Site: None




Sports Law



SLN #: 16268
Course Prefix: LAW-715
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Jay

Course Description:
Sports Law is a course that deals with the legal issues relating to the structure and operation of the sports industry. The course reviews various principles applicable to sports including antitrust, labor, intellectual property, league policies, NCAA regulations, and general business operations. Various other legal issues relating to professional and amateur sports will be covered.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes for students with regular attendance and contribution to discussion
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Teaching Assistant



SLN #: 17830
Course Prefix: LAW-735
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s):

Course Description:
Teaching Assistants work closely with the Professor to whom they are assigned. Teaching Assistants are expected to attend the course to which they are assigned and meet with the Professor weekly. Teaching Assistants are expected to be available to students and to work well without intensive supervision. Teaching Assistants can expect to spend an average of six to eight hours a week fulfilling their duties, although this may vary from week to week.

Teaching Assistants are chosen through a selection process determined by each professor.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




The Moral Leader



SLN #: 26478
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 024
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Cabot

Course Description:
The successful lawyer will be presented with moral and ethical choices throughout his professional career. This innovative course is designed to encourage students to confront those fundamental moral challenges, to develop skills in moral analysis and judgment, and to come to terms with their own definition of moral leadership and how it can be translated into action. The course is based on the leadership course, The Moral Leader, brought by Professor Robert Coles, an educator and psychiatrist, to Harvard Business School in the 1980s. Since then it has been taught to thousands of students at Harvard’s schools of business, law, medicine, architecture, politics, design, divinity and education. Drawing on the inspiration of major literary and historical figures such as Machiavelli, Truman, and Achebe, and based upon an impressive array of literary sources, including novels, plays, history, and biography, the seminar-style setting of the course requires students to be thoroughly prepared for each session, willing to participate in rigorous analysis, continual dialogue, and intensive discussion.

The focus of this course is not on morality versus immorality, but on leadership, moral decision-making, and action. The course is comprised of three modules: (i) Moral Challenge, in which students explore fundamental moral problems and the strategies used to come to terms with them; (ii) Moral Reasoning, in which students are introduced to methods and modes of "moral reasoning" that help in justifying, or not justifying, decisions made in complex situations; and (iii) Moral Leadership, in which students confront examples of moral leadership per se.

In 13 sessions each two hours long, with readings in a multiplicity of settings ranging from ancient Greece to contemporary America, students learn to identify moral problems, to address them systematically, and to develop skills that aid them in their professional and personal lives.

Forty percent (40%) of the grade for the course is based on class participation and sixty percent (60%) on a paper, roughly 15 pages in length.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Paper - 60% of grade
Participation Points: Yes, 40% of grade
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Trademark and Unfair Competition Law



SLN #: 12711
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 008
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Long

Course Description:
This course’s objective is to provide the student with a practical, business-oriented understanding of trademark and unfair competition law. The course will cover general principles, including acquisition, maintenance, and enforcement of both registered and unregistered trademark rights. Litigation practices and issues will receive particular emphasis. The course will also address trademark dilution, cyberpiracy and other Internet issues, right of publicity, false endorsement, and federal deceptive advertising. At a minimum, the student should emerge from this course with a thorough understanding of why a trademark and unfair competition practice is one of the most fun a lawyer can choose!

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Possibly
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Trial Advocacy



SLN #: 12694
Course Prefix: LAW-738
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sands

Course Description:
Students learn trial advocacy by performing opening statements, direct and cross-examination, objections, motions to the Court, final arguments and other aspects of trial practice. The course culminates in a jury trial. Student presentations will be videotaped for classroom critique. Students will also learn how to use courtroom technology for displaying or playing evidentiary exhibits or visual aids and will be asked to use this technology during their presentations.

Students who have taken Applied Evidence in Trial Advocacy will not be allowed to take this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Special Withdrawal Course: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Trial Advocacy



SLN #: 12741
Course Prefix: LAW-738
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Cabot

Course Description:
Students learn trial advocacy by performing opening statements, direct and cross-examination, objections, motions to the Court, final arguments and other aspects of trial practice. The course culminates in a jury trial. Student presentations will be videotaped for classroom critique. Students will also learn how to use courtroom technology for displaying or playing evidentiary exhibits or visual aids and will be asked to use this technology during their presentations.

Students who have taken Applied Evidence in Trial Advocacy will not be allowed to take this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Limited Enrollment Number: 14
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes. Pleadings related to final trials.
Participation Points: Yes. Students are expected and encouraged to participate in each week's exercise.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Truman Young Fellowship



SLN #: 14984
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 012
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Ames

Course Description:
This is a year-long fellowship. The applicant is selected through an application process. Information about the fellowship, and the application can be found at: http://law.asu.edu/clinics/TheClinicalProgram/Fellowships.aspx

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




US Law and Legal Analysis (MLS & LLM)



SLN #: 17746
Course Prefix: LAW-581
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Holsman Tetreault

Course Description:
This on-line course will introduce MLS and LL.M students to the U.S. legal system and to the types of legal reasoning used by lawyers and judges. Students will be provided the necessary instruction to use legal reasoning in their academic work, including reading and understanding cases and statutes, doing basic legal research and writing legal memoranda, and applying existing law to the issue at hand. Finally, the course will provide an overview of a handful of key areas that are particularly important for business and policy applications, such as federalism/pre-emption, constitutional law and administrative law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Online
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Utilities, Sustainability and the Law



SLN #: 12692
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Mayes

Course Description:
Students will examine utility law in Arizona and the United States, with a particular focus on how traditional ratemaking is accomplished in an era of renewable energy portfolio standards, energy efficiency mandates and greenhouse gas emissions reductions regimes for electric and natural gas utilities. Since energy sustainability laws and regulatory policies are largely imposed on and carried out by utilities, the course will begin with an examination of the fundamentals of utility regulation. Additionally, the course will follow current trends in utility regulation such as adjustor mechanisms designed to pass through natural gas and other commodity costs, renewable energy and energy efficiency surcharge mechanisms and the rate-basing of renewable energy projects, construction work in progress allowances in rate base, and attrition adjustments. Finally, the course will address new and emerging trends in utility law, including a discussion of transmission policies promoting renewable energy development, federal and state efforts on Demand Response and the Smart Grid, and the regulation of greenhouse gasses, including proposed federal climate change legislation.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Victims in Criminal Procedure



SLN #: 17745
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 014
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Twist

Course Description:
Victims in Criminal Procedure will explore the historical and evolving role of crime victims in the criminal justice process. The law and litigation of crime victims’ rights at the state and federal levels will be examined. Among the topics that will be considered are constitutional and statutory rights for crime victims, the effect of these rights on the rights of the defendant and the criminal justice system generally. The question of enforcing victims’ rights and case law developments will also be considered.

The course is a 2 credit course with the option of earning one externship credit for students who agree to work 60 hours during the semester for the Victims Legal Assistance Project.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes, 15-20 page paper
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Writing TA



SLN #: 13930
Course Prefix: LAW-735
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Herrera

Course Description:
Teaching Assistants work closely with the Legal Writing Professor to whom they are assigned and provide guidance and mentoring to first-year students. Teaching Assistants help with problem selection and generating model answers, hold office hours to assist first-year students with research, help create and grade research and citation exercises, occasionally help with class preparation and/or presentation, and assist with oral argument in the spring. Teaching Assistants generally do not play a major role in teaching and grading first-year students. Teaching Assistants are expected to attend the Legal Research and Writing Course to which they are assigned and meet with the Professor weekly. Teaching Assistants are expected to be available to first-year students and to work well without intensive supervision. Teaching Assistants can expect to spend an average of six to eight hours a week fulfilling their duties, although this may vary from week to week.

Teaching Assistants receive 2 Pass/Fail credit hours each semester (for a total of 4 credit hours). Some positions are for the year; others are for one semester only, depending upon the professor's teaching schedule.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None





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