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2011 Fall



Academic Support Program



SLN #:
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 012
Credit Hours: -
Instructor(s): Rosen

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: -
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Administrative Hearings & Special Proceedings (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87292
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 010
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Nowlan;Irvine

Course Description:
Administrative hearings are part of the executive branch process through which regulations authorized by the legislature are established through an executive body no one has heard of, dealing with a very broad range of issues, based on law that is difficult to find. The hearings take place in front of tribunals that are not necessarily presided over by judges and are part of a process that must be complied with before access can be gained to the courts. This course explores the Arizona regulatory process, compliance, due process issues, required elements of proof and obtaining judicial review. In addition, the course addresses other special proceedings (such as special actions) that fall outside the typical adjudication process in Arizona state courts.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Adv Legal Research



SLN #: 76154
Course Prefix: LAW-736
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Difelice

Course Description:
This course will focus on a rigorous review of the basic print and electronic resources and strategies for conducting legal research, federal and state. Case law, statutes and legislative history, administrative rules and procedures and finding tools will all be covered. This course is labor intensive. The best way to learn to conduct effective legal research is to use the full range of tools available and then practice, practice, practice! Students will be in class two hours per week. The third class hour is given to account for the time you will spend on the various homework assignments.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Adv. Legal Writing: Adv. Persuasion & Creative Advocacy



SLN #: 87271
Course Prefix: LAW-626
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sperling

Course Description:
Persuasion is part art and part science, part instinct and part method. In this course students will examine the power of different persuasive practices. Building upon perspectives from different disciplines, such as rhetoric and cognitive psychology, students will gain a deeper understanding of what makes an argument or document persuasive. The course will investigate how the tools of persuasion work, and what tools work best. Students will creatively apply different theories of persuasion in several writing assignments and oral presentations.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 14
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Advanced Criminal Procedure



SLN #: 87220
Course Prefix: LAW-610
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Sands;Wilkinson

Course Description:
This course builds upon the basic course in Criminal Procedure. Topics addressed include the following: prosecutorial discretion; preliminary hearings; grand jury proceedings; pretrial release; discovery rights; guilty pleas and plea bargaining; double jeopardy; appeals and post-conviction review.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Advocacy: Creditor Remedies (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87285
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Spurlock;Anderson

Course Description:
This course focuses on provisional pre-judgment and post-judgment procedures used to protect and enforce contractual obligations and money judgments. Topics to be covered include the constitutionality of provisional pre-judgment remedies, necessary procedures to effectuate valid executions, garnishments, replevins and attachments, and perfecting judgment liens.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Advocacy: Land Use Proceedings (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87286
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Lagarde;Gross

Course Description:
This course focuses on the practice of advocating land use cases before administrative, quasi-judicial and legislative bodies. Covered topics include:

• Introduction to the land use entitlement process
• Advocacy in staff review and community outreach
o Role of staff in land use cases
o Application strategy and processing the land use case
• Advocacy before administrative bodies
o The land use hearing process
o Planning hearing officer/Zoning administrator
o Planning Commission
o Development/design review
• Advocacy before legislative bodies
o City/Town Council and Boards of Supervisors
o Lobbying decision makers
• Advocacy before quasi-judicial bodies
o Variances and use permit application requirements
o Special rules for Boards of Adjustment
• Appeal of quasi-judicial decisions and of legislative decisions
• Special issues impacting land use advocacy strategies, including:
o Exactions
o Proposition 207
o Due process and equal protection
o Referendum


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Alternative Dispute Resolution



SLN #: 87253
Course Prefix: LAW-702
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Meyerson

Course Description:
This survey course will comprehensively examine the use of alternative methods to resolve disputes. Students will become familiar with negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. In addition to studying the law and theory applicable to alternative dispute resolution, students will engage in simulations of negotiations and mediations.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: Yes, short 1 hour exam will be given
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: None




Applied Evidence in Trial Advocacy



SLN #: 72581
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 018
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Dallyn

Course Description:
Students learn trial advocacy by presenting opening statements, direct and cross-examination, objections, motions to the Court, final arguments and other aspects of trial practice. Students will also address issues of evidence law and civil procedure raised in the simulated trial practice problems. The course culminates in a jury trial. Student presentations will be videotaped for individual critique. Students will also learn how to use courtroom technology for displaying evidentiary exhibits or visual aids and will be asked to use this technology during their presentations.

Students who have taken Trial Advocacy will not be allowed to take this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Special Withdrawal Course: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes, Pleadings and motions related to final trials/individual in-class presentations.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Attorneys' Fees, Costs and Sanctions (2nd 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87293
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 011
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Ayers

Course Description:
Under the so-called “American Rule,” parties to litigation must pay their own attorneys’ fees and costs. That Rule, however, is subject to a host of fee-shifting exceptions that allow a prevailing party to recover its attorneys’ fees from the losing party. In addition, courts may sometimes award a party all or a portion of its attorneys’ fees as a sanction to redress its opponent’s improper litigation tactics. This course examines, among other subjects:

• Contingent fee arrangements;
• Statutory and other grounds for attorneys’ fee awards to the prevailing party;
• Procedures for seeking the recovery of attorneys’ fees and costs; and
• Fee and cost sanctions under Rule 11 (and other Rules).

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Biotech Licensing & Litigation



SLN #: 87471
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 025
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Burns

Course Description:
This seminar will provide students with an extraordinary opportunity to engage in supervised independent legal research on legal issues involving biotechnology. Students may select a research topic of interest from among any of the many sub-fields of biotechnology including, but not limited to, genomics, proteinomics, genetic engineering, personalized medicine, utilization of bacteria, yeasts and other living organisms in connection with medical treatment, diagnostics, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, biofuels, sustainability/clean technology and many others. Students' research will culminate in an oral presentation to the class and a written paper that may satisfy the graduation writing requirement upon approval of the instructor and full-time faculty member. In addition to oral presentations, students will explore in class best practices in drafting licenses and other biotechnology-related agreements and how biotechnology-related disputes are resolved through study of select examples of patent infringement and trade secret misappropriation cases, license and other biotechnology-related contract litigation, and alternative dispute resolution such as arbitration and mediation.

Course materials: To be provided.

Evaluation of Course: Students will be graded on their oral presentation and research paper, with extra credit given for class participation and perfect attendance.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes, see course description
Participation Points: Yes, see course description
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Block



SLN #:
Course Prefix: LAW-000
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s):

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Business Organizations



SLN #: 72552
Course Prefix: LAW-654
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Lynk

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Business Organizations



SLN #: 87336
Course Prefix: LAW-654
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Forst

Course Description:
This course describes how the laws governing business organizations impact the work of all lawyers. A basic understanding of the legal organization and management of business enterprises, and the law of agency, partnership, corporations, and securities, is routinely needed across a diverse range of legal specializations.

Initially, we study how businesses are legally formed. It is fundamental to understand all the forms into which business enterprises are organized, and the pros and cons of each form. Business enterprises can be organized in various ways to achieve different goals. Lawyers are often called upon by business people to help them select the form of business through which they can most effectively achieve their business goals. Accordingly, we study sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and the increasingly popular new form of enterprise called the limited liability company (“LLC”).

We survey why and how companies “go public” and the implications of this decision and examine how the capital markets are regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and the securities laws. In today’s environment we have the unique opportunity to focus on the U.S. financial crisis, and how business and Wall Street practices factor into the evolving role of corporate law, the SEC, and public companies. We examine how businesses are regulated and why. We analyze the legal standard of conduct expected of companies, their owners and executives.

The major focus of the course is on the most popular form of business organization, the corporation. We study how corporations are used to raise and manage capital, allocate risk, and divide ownership and management prerogatives. We focus on the responsibilities of boards of directors, the rights of shareholders, the issuance of stock, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate governance. We also examine broader policy questions such as how our economic system and business needs promote business interests and shape laws and regulations in the United States.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Business, Law & Society



SLN #: 84133
Course Prefix: LAW-294
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s): Stafford

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Business, Law & Society



SLN #: 86508
Course Prefix: LAW-294
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s): Herbert

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Career Services



SLN #:
Course Prefix: LAW-101
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s):

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Civil Justice Clinic



SLN #: 72559
Course Prefix: LAW-773
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Dauber

Course Description:
This Civil Justice Clinic provides students with the opportunity to provide quality representation to individuals who need pro bono representation and non-profit clients who need legislative lawyering services. With faculty supervision, clinic students may participate in case selection, interviewing and counseling clients, fact investigation, theory development, representing clients in administrative hearings, drafting appellate briefs, or appearing for oral argument in appellate court.

The Clinic also includes a seminar component that focuses on relevant substantive law and training/simulations on relevant skills (such as interviewing, counseling, negotiation, public speaking, and legislative lawyering).

The Clinic is a graded 6 credit course. Students are expected to spend approximately 20 hours per week and at least 300 hours total in the Clinic during the semester. For more information about the course and program, see the Clinic’s webpage at: http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Civil Procedure



SLN #: 72529
Course Prefix: LAW-518
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Schatzki

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Civil Procedure



SLN #: 72530
Course Prefix: LAW-518
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Hurwitz

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Civil Procedure



SLN #: 72531
Course Prefix: LAW-518
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Lynk

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Commercial Real Estate Law and Practice



SLN #: 77865
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Scheurich

Course Description:
A study of the legal principles governing commercial real estate transactions and their practical application by the practitioner, including purchases and sales, title insurance, secured financing, foreclosures, and commercial leases.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Community Property



SLN #: 72542
Course Prefix: LAW-624
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Matheson

Course Description:
This will be an in-depth exploration of community property, with emphasis on Arizona law but comparative treatment with the other community states and the uniform Marital Property Act. Subject matter includes property rights of unmarried couples, determination of the community, classification of property as community or separate, management and control, rights of creditors, rights on dissolution by divorce or death of one spouse, and conflict of laws between states when a couple changes marital domicile.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Per College of Law policy, professor reserves the right to withdraw students for excessive absences
Online Course Site: None




Constitutional Law II



SLN #: 72543
Course Prefix: LAW-625
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Matheson

Course Description:
The course will deal with individual rights protected by the U.S. Constitution. Specific areas will include substantive due process, freedom of expression and religion, and equal protection.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Per the College of Law policy, the professor reserves the right to withdraw a student for excessive absence.
Online Course Site: None




Consumer Protection Law



SLN #: 84201
Course Prefix: LAW-394
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s): Feigal

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Contract Drafting & Negotiating



SLN #: 72536
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 008
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Chesler

Course Description:
This course provides students with the opportunity to learn the basic principles of contract drafting, interpretation, and negotiation. This course will also introduce students to the role of the transactional lawyer. Emphasis will be placed on drafting contractual agreements that effectuate clients’ needs and anticipate potential legal problems. Students will be required to work independently and collaboratively to negotiate and draft a series of written contracts, such as a sales agreement, an employment agreement, and a settlement agreement. Students may also be required to perform research relating to the drafting of those contracts. On all of these assignments, students will receive feedback.

This course is open to JD candidates only.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Contracts
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Contract Drafting & Negotiating



SLN #: 87252
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 013
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Chesler

Course Description:
This course provides students with the opportunity to learn the basic principles of contract drafting, interpretation, and negotiation. This course will also introduce students to the role of the transactional lawyer. Emphasis will be placed on drafting contractual agreements that effectuate clients’ needs and anticipate potential legal problems. Students will be required to work independently and collaboratively to negotiate and draft a series of written contracts, such as a sales agreement, an employment agreement, and a settlement agreement. Students may also be required to perform research relating to the drafting of those contracts. On all of these assignments, students will receive feedback.

This course is open to JD candidates only.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Contracts
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Contracts



SLN #: 72522
Course Prefix: LAW-515
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Rose

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Contracts



SLN #: 72523
Course Prefix: LAW-515
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Gubler

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Contracts



SLN #: 72524
Course Prefix: LAW-515
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Calleros

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Copyright Law



SLN #: 77872
Course Prefix: LAW-646
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Karjala

Course Description:
This course provides a detailed introduction to the law of copyright. It emphasizes the basics of traditional copyright protection for art, music, and literature and but also considers the application of those basic principles in an age of digital technology (music sharing á la Grokster, internet hyperlinking, protection of computer programs and user interfaces, and similar current issues). Copyright law is now important well beyond the entertainment industry, although many of the decisions we study derive from that genre. (Humphrey Bogart, Cole Porter, George Harrison, J.D. Salinger, Superman, Mickey Mouse, and many other luminaries make cameo appearances in our cases.) Copyright (and copyright-like protection schemes) have become an increasingly important element of a general law practice as a result of the explosive growth in economic value of information-based products, like computer software and digital networks and databases. The lawyer ignorant of basic copyright principles will be increasingly handicapped in many areas of practice, such as negotiating technology transfers, drafting contractual rights, developing schemes of protection and privacy, distinguishing criminal from noncriminal behavior, and in litigation. But more important than all that, the cases and materials are lots of fun!

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Participation points may be given
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is expected
Online Course Site: None




Creative Writing for Lawyers



SLN #: 72575
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 012
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Stuart

Course Description:
NOTE: This is a compressed class that will meet on Tuesdays from 3:30 pm - 4:55pm on the following days: August 23, August 30, September 6, September 13, September 20, September 27, October 4, and October 18.

The core thesis underlying this course is that legal writing can be greatly improved by using many of the techniques fiction writers use. The notion of story, emotional vibrancy, and profluence are creative additions to otherwise drab legal writing.

The first class will be a 90-minute lecture/demonstration on how creative writing can aid and abet legal writing. The remaining seven classes will consist of a 20 minute lecture-discussion session and a 70-minute writing workshop.

Each student will write and post seven writing assignments on the class web site. We will critique one another’s writings every week (both on-line and in class). All students must write. Students afflicted with writer’s block or unreliable Internet connections should not take this course. Reliable email service is essential. The class web site will run on Blackboard. All students should be familiar with the usual process of accessing, reviewing, and posting material to a Blackboard site.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Creative Writing for Lawyers



SLN #: 72577
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 014
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Feeney

Course Description:
This class that will meet on eight Wednesdays during the semester from 8:15 am - 9:55 am. Meeting days will be 8/24, 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/19, 10/26, 11/9, and 11/23.

The first class will be a 90-minute lecture/demonstration on how creative writing can aid and abet legal writing. The remaining seven classes will consist of a 20 minute lecture-discussion session and a 70-minute writing workshop. Each student will write and post seven writing assignments on the class web site. We will critique one another’s writings every week (both on-line and in class). All students must write. Students afflicted with writer’s block or unreliable Internet connections should not take this course. Reliable email service is essential. The class web site will run on Blackboard. All students should be familiar with the usual process of accessing, reviewing, and posting material to a Blackboard site.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Criminal Practice Clinic



SLN #: 72560
Course Prefix: LAW-774
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Zettler

Course Description:
Students enrolled in the Criminal Practice Clinic prosecute misdemeanor cases in courts in the area. Students are responsible for a full range of trial-related tasks, including witness interviews, pre-trial motions, and courtroom advocacy. The Criminal Practice Clinic provides somewhat more frequent opportunities for trial work and fewer opportunities for such tasks as client interviewing, counseling, and discovery than the other clinics. Students are placed with various City Attorney Offices in the area (usually Tempe, Chandler, Glendale, Scottsdale, Mesa, Gilbert, Peoria, and the County Attorney's Office), and work under the direct supervision of assistant city attorneys. Overall supervision of the Criminal Practice Clinic is provided by Faculty Associate Hugo Zettler. At the beginning of the semester, students will work on simple cases against defendants who represent themselves. Students then move to cases where an attorney is representing the defendant. Eventually each student will conduct a jury trial under a supervisor's advisement. Students are expected to spend 300 hours in the Clinic during the semester (approximately 30 hours of classroom instruction and 270 hours in an assigned prosecutor's office). Because the summer session is condensed, students should not plan on working another job during the summer semester. As a general guideline, students are expected to work 20 hours per week during the fall and spring semesters, and 30 hours per week during the summer semester (OR 30 hours per week for 10 weeks, or 40 hours per week for 8 weeks).

During the fall and spring semesters, blocks of time must be available to be in the courtroom. During the summer, students should be available all day, every day, five days a week. The blocks of time needed during the fall and spring semesters are four (4) hours in the morning (8 a.m. - noon) or afternoon (1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.). Students' fieldwork schedule for the fall and spring should be set up as one of the following:

1. five (5) half days; or
2. two (2) full days and one (1) half day; or
3. one (1) full day and three (3) half days.

If a student is interested in working at the City of Phoenix, Tuesdays and Thursdays must be completely available.

Each student will be given the opportunity to list his or her first, second, third, etc. choices for the office at which he or she would like to work. Professor Zettler will do his best to give students their first choice, but this is not always possible. Please be aware that some prosecutor offices may require a drug test.

The Criminal Practice Clinic has a mandatory seminar component that addresses various problems in the prosecution of criminal cases. The seminar sessions include simulation exercises in trial practice, including how to do direct examination, cross examination, and present opening statements and closing arguments. Classes during the summer are on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. During the fall and spring semesters, classes are on Wednesday evenings.

The Criminal Practice Clinic is a graded course (6 credits). Evidence is a prerequisite. Trial Advocacy is not a prerequisite, but if students have been through this course, the skills are beneficial to students' cases. Students may not take Trial Advocacy and the Criminal Practice Clinic in the same semester.

Enrollment in the Criminal Practice Clinic is limited to eight (8) students during the summer session and ten (10) students in the fall and spring semesters.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 8
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Criminal Procedure



SLN #: 72538
Course Prefix: LAW-604
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Hessick

Course Description:
This course will cover the Fourth Amendment's prohibition on unreasonable searches and seizures, the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, and the Sixth Amendment right to counsel. Course requirements include regular class participation and an in-class final examination.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Cults & Alt Religions



SLN #: 87689
Course Prefix: LAW-737
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3/4
Instructor(s): Demaine

Course Description:
This seminar provides students an opportunity to study laws and policies governing cults and alternative religions. While the definition of a “cult” will be a topic of initial study in the seminar, it may be conceived of loosely as a group with a charismatic leader whose members are persuaded to relinquish their self-identities and material possessions in furtherance of the group’s goals. In addition to analyzing the definition of a “cult,” the first part of the seminar will be devoted to discussing the various types of cults, studying particular cults, and learning about cultic activities. The remainder of the seminar will cover domestic and foreign legal and policy issues generated by cults, including the legal rights of cultic organizations, anti-cult organizations, cult members, and cult members’ families. To the degree that religious movements falling outside the mainstream, coventional religions are conceptually similar to cults or treated similarly under the law, they also will be covered.

Students may take the seminar for either three or four credits. Students who select the latter option will be responsible for completing additional, and more involved, assignments than students pursuing the former option. These assignments may include, for example, submitting comments and questions on the weekly readings, and submitting a lengthier final paper.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3/4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Depends on number of credits
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




DC Externship



SLN #: 81496
Course Prefix: LAW-785
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 9
Instructor(s): Askland

Course Description:
There are two dozen students in our Washington, DC Legal Externship Program this semester. They are doing fascinating and exceptionally substantive work at externship placement sites including the Departments of Justice, Defense, Transportation, and State, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Trade Commission's Deceptive Advertising Division, the Federal Communications Commission's International Bureau, and the Securities & Exchange Commission -- plus several Congressional offices and exciting non-profit organizations including Break the Cycle. Additional student placements last semester included the Embassy of Canada, the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, Transparency International (the leading anti-corruption organization), a leading environmental law organization, and the anti-trafficking division of the Organization of American States. Special programs this semester include a meeting at the Supreme Court with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a Pentagon visit and briefing, numerous guest speakers, and more.

Through the DC Program, you too can spend a semester in an exciting, career-building externship with a government or nonprofit legal office in Washington, DC. The Program helps you find an externship placement that fits with your particular interests, includes special programming and academic courses designed to help you learn and succeed in your externship, and offers optional but guaranteed apartment-style housing in Washington, DC. In addition to the placement sites mentioned above, many other exciting placement sites have also expressed enthusiasm for receiving applications from Program participants, including the general counsel's offices at the U.S. departments of Homeland Security, Health & Human Services, Education, and many more.

We have found that many of the happiest and most successful ASU law school alumni in the nation’s capital got their start in Washington, DC -- their first foot in the door -- with externships while in law school, and that the DC externship experience, credential, and connections has provided other students with an invaluable boost when they apply for federal, state, local, and law firm jobs in Arizona and elsewhere.

While law firm jobs have grown scarcer nationwide (including in Arizona), the federal government and other employers are continuing to hire attorneys in Washington, DC. This Program can provide you with an invaluable foot in the door to Washington, DC employers, and an important credential when you apply for federal, state, local, and law firm jobs in Arizona and elsewhere. More information about the Program is available on the Program web site at http://www.law.asu.edu/WLEP and in the FAQs at http://www.law.asu.edu/programs/Programs/TheWashingtonDCLegalExternshipProgram/WLEPOConnor.aspx.

We look forward to your application, and hopefully to your participation in the DC Program this fall!

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 9
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Debtor/Creditor & Bankruptcy Law



SLN #: 72551
Course Prefix: LAW-653
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Haines

Course Description:
This course will cover basic debtor-creditor law and bankruptcy law and practice. It begins with the state and common law governing how money judgments are enforced, debtors' strategies to avoid collection, and who gets paid when there is not enough money to go around. This also includes federal statutory limitations on collection remedies. It then addresses liquidation under Chapter 7 of the Bankruptcy Code, the effect of the discharge of debts in bankruptcy, the exceptions to discharge, and the new “means test” limitations on eligibility to file for a Chapter 7 discharge. This leads to the Chapter 13 "wage earner" plan for repayment of creditors over time. The latter half of the course will focus more on aspects of commercial bankruptcy law, including the automatic stay, preferences and fraudulent conveyances, and the trustee's "strong arm" powers. It is these laws that prescribe the outer limits of creditors' rights and make the bankruptcy courts the de facto commercial courts for the nation. There are no prerequisites to this course, although a background in secured transactions would be very helpful. Nor is this course a prerequisite to the Chapter 11 course that is taught every other spring semester, but it would provide extremely useful background if you intend to take that course, and the two courses will be taught as a logical sequence with minimal overlap. Attendance is expected and up to two points will be added or subtracted for participation.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes, per College of Law attendance policy.
Online Course Site: None




Decedent's Estates



SLN #: 72541
Course Prefix: LAW-618
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Becker

Course Description:
The Decedent's Estates course will provide an overview of the law of intestacy, wills, probate and non-testamentary property transfers. This course focuses on common law and a comparison between the Uniform Probate Code and the Arizona statutes. Drafting issues and techniques are covered. The course is comprehensive, but does NOT cover complex estate planning or tax. This course is important for all second and/or third year law students. Every lawyer should have a working knowledge of wills and estates. This is also a major subject on most bar exams. This course will use the Dukeminier Johanson "Wills, Trusts and Estates" casebook, and will cover chapters 1 - 8 therein.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Domestic Violence & the Law



SLN #: 77878
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 009
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Buel

Course Description:
Given the frequency with which domestic violence victims turn to the courts for help, this course will examine the construction of rights within civil and criminal law, including those involving alternative procedural frameworks. We begin with law and the social context of battering, including how the experience of abuse is shaped by race, cultural identity, economic status, sexual orientation, and disabilities. We next view how the law recognizes domestic violence in relation to child custody, divorce, visitation, and child protection matters. Among other topics, the course will also cover tort liability for batterers and third parties (police, employers, etc.), and federal remedies, such as the Violence Against Women Act. Criminal law aspects are addressed within the role of protective orders, prosecution, and defense, including self-defense for victims and ethical representation of batterers. Violence against women as a human rights violation and in the context of human trafficking and sexual assault are introduced, with discussions designed to bridge theory and practice. The focus of the class is to examine current challenges and shortcomings in the legal response to intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking, and then draft proposals for systems change through the social justice lens.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Minimum 20 page paper
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: 25
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: 10%
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: No
Online Course Site: None




Econ Dev in Indian Country



SLN #: 78130
Course Prefix: LAW-718
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Artman

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




E-Discovery and Digital Evidence (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87283
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Holm

Course Description:
The advent of e-discovery has had an extraordinary impact on American jurisprudence. The unbridled proliferation of e-mail and other forms of electronically stored information (“ESI”) has proved daunting to litigants, counsel and the courts. ESI has eclipsed other forms of evidence and has required a radical change in how disputes are litigated and resolved. Recent e-discovery amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the rules of many states, including Arizona, are a testament to the judiciary’s recognition of the growing importance of e-discovery in our judicial system. This course will address the rapidly developing e-discovery case law and tackle the challenging issues arising from the emerging e-discovery phenomenon. Subject areas covered will include a survey of relevant information technology, ESI preservation obligations, search and retrieval, ESI production methods, spoliation and sanctions, attorney-client privilege and ethical issues, and admissibility of digital evidence.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Environmental Justice



SLN #: 72576
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 013
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Shanker

Course Description:
This seminar will study the law and policy of environmental justice, which has become an important new concept in environmental law and policy. We will review the data analyzing discriminatory impacts of hazardous and polluting activities on minority and low-income communities, seek to understand the possible explanations for those data, and explore potential remedies and their consequences for addressing the disparate impacts. We will also explore the concepts of justice and fairness in environmental law and policy more broadly, including the distribution of environmental risks and benefits across population groups, nations, and generations.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Paper
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Estate and Gift Tax



SLN #: 72540
Course Prefix: LAW-611
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Becker

Course Description:
This course will focus on the Federal estate, gift and generation skipping transfer taxes which govern the transfer of wealth during lifetime and at death

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Ethics and Government Practice



SLN #: 81854
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 028
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Askland

Course Description:
This course takes place in D.C. The first class will be held on Wednesday, September 7 from 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm. Classes will held on subsequent Wednesdays, but the last class will be held on the Tuesday instead of the Wednesday before Thanksgiving.

Ethics shapes every aspect of effective legal practice in public service. This course will review fundamental ethical principles and apply them to various challenges presented by the executive, legislative and regulatory legal practice.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Evidence



SLN #: 72539
Course Prefix: LAW-605
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Hessick

Course Description:
Evidence covers the basic rules that govern the admissibility of evidence in civil and criminal trial proceedings. The primary focus is on how the Federal Rules of Evidence operate in practice, with some attention to areas in which the Arizona Rules of Evidence differ from the Federal Rules. The course is primarily taught by the problem method, with a focus on the practical application of the rules in a trial setting. This is a complex and difficult subject, but one that most practicing lawyers -- including non-litigators -- need to know; and it would be an especially tough subject to try to learn from scratch from a bar review course. Students should make every effort to take Evidence before taking Trial Advocacy or clinical courses.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Externship



SLN #: 72563
Course Prefix: LAW-785
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-12
Instructor(s): Barnes

Course Description:
Experience: The real teacher. The externship experience enhances your law school education and allows you the opportunity to refine your professional skills while working closely with esteemed lawyers, judges and judicial clerks. Placements are available with governmental entities such as the Office of the Attorney General, United States Department of Justice, and Maricopa County Public Defender, and with non-profit organizations, such as Community Legal Services, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, and Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest. Judicial placements are available with the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, United States Bankruptcy Court, United States District Court, Maricopa County Superior Court, Arizona Court of Appeals, and occasionally the Arizona Supreme Court. Accordingly, the College will normally recognize a maximum of 12 credit hours for law school externship work in partial fulfillment of the J.D. degree under the guidelines set forth in the STATEMENT OF STUDENT POLICIES. A listing of all available externship opportunities is distributed to students in September (for spring) and in January (for summer and fall.) Please see Carolyn Landry in Room 101 if you have any questions.

Students will be required to attend two classes. The first class will be held on Wednesday, August 17 from 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm in room 116. The second class will meet September 30 from 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm in the Rotunda.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-12
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Family Law



SLN #: 87221
Course Prefix: LAW-612
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Maerowitz

Course Description:
The law of marriage and divorce is the primary focus of this course. This includes the law governing entry into marriage, the legal consequences of being married, and the dissolution of the marital status. Topics include: the division of property, spousal maintenance and child support, child custody arrangements, antenuptial and separation agreements, and jurisdictional issues. To the extent time permits, non-traditional families are also considered, including marriage between same-sex partners, the rights and obligations of unmarried cohabitants, and the establishment of paternity rights and obligations. Relevant Arizona Statutes are referred to throughout the course where appropriate as examples, but the course is not limited to Arizona law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




FDA Regulation



SLN #: 87247
Course Prefix: LAW-667
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Feigal;Morris;Shire

Course Description:
This course will examine the regulation of drugs, medical devices, and biologics (e.g., vaccines) by the Food and Drug Administration. These categories of products are the primary products of the emerging biotechnology and genomics industry, as well as the traditional pharmaceutical industry, and therefore is critical for students who are interested in representing life science companies or medical research institutions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Students can choose to complete a research paper or take-home final exam.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Federal Advocacy for the Tribal Client



SLN #: 87916
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 030
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Gover;Artman

Course Description:
• Class will meet Monday, October 10 through Friday, October 14.
• Monday through Friday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm and 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm
• The class is limited to 12 students - if there is more student demand, students seeking the Indian Law Certificate will receive preference.

This course, held in Washington D.C. during fall break. The class will introduce students to the practical application of the government-to-government relationship between tribes and the federal government. Through lectures, discussion, reading, guest speakers and actual site visits, students will learn how to effectively communicate with governmental officials and elected leaders in the federal system. The class will discuss the different roles Indian law attorneys and advocates play in the advancement of tribal interests in the federal system. Topics to be explored include the federal budget cycle, structure and function of the Congressional committee system including the purpose of conference and committee reports, evaluating the need and purpose of a paid lobbyist, and the role of tribal coalitions and intertribal organizations. Although the class will include a discussion of the entire federal system and all federal agencies, particular focus will be given to those agencies and departments that have a primary role in tribal issues, including the Department of Interior and Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Indian Health Service and Department of Education.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Federal Income Taxation



SLN #: 87217
Course Prefix: LAW-606
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Chodorow

Course Description:
Federal Income Tax. The Federal income tax touches virtually every aspect of modern American life. For practicing lawyers, a basic understanding of the structure and vocabulary of the tax code is critical. This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and issues in taxation, focusing primarily on the taxation of individuals. Coursework will include review of specific code provisions, administrative materials, and important cases. It is the prerequisite for all other tax courses. Problems are assigned for each class, and students are expected to have done these problems and come prepared to discuss them.

Class participation counts for 10% of the final grade.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Participation Points: Yes, see course description
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is required
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Federal Indian Law I



SLN #: 72544
Course Prefix: LAW-632
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Clinton

Course Description:
Federal Indian Law I surveys the political and legal relationship of Native Nations to the United States. The course provides a historical examination of the treaties and other instruments used to negotiate a political relationship between these separate governments and delves into a comprehensive examination of the legal relationship that developed between American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian peoples and the United States government. Primarily the course covers the federal Indian law imposed on Indian country (which constitutes 27% of the Arizona land area). It is not a course in tribal law. The emphasis of this course is on understanding the historical foundations for and the contemporary legal and political relationship between Native Nations, the United States government, and the various state governments. Thus, primary attention is devoted to jurisdictional issues, including the framework for determining civil regulatory and taxing authority, and civil and criminal adjudicatory authority in Indian Country. Federal Indian Law I also constitutes a prerequisite for some of the advanced Indian law courses.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Participation Points: Yes -- See Syllabus
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




First Amendment



SLN #: 72580
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 017
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Weinstein

Course Description:
The first few sessions will be devoted to reading basic material on free speech as well as recently decided Supreme Court decisions on the subject. The seminar will then cover topics in free speech to be selected by the class and the instructor. We may also spend a session or two on the Religion Clauses of the First Amendment.

Sessions at the end of the semester will be devoted to discussions of drafts or outlines of student papers.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Prerequisite: Con Law II
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Genetics and the Law



SLN #: 77870
Course Prefix: LAW-617
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Marchant;Lindor

Course Description:
Many commentators predict that the 21st Century will be the Century of the Genome, in which advances in genetic technology will fundamentally transform society, the economy, and our day-to-day lives. Already, advances in genetic sciences are having a substantial impact on diverse areas such as criminal law, health care, agriculture, and pharmaceuticals. The legal system is increasingly being called upon to address issues related to genetics, and many legislators, judges, regulators, and practicing attorneys are scrambling to learn about the new legal problems and opportunities created by advances in genetic sciences. This course will provide students with background on genetics and recent genetic advances, and it will address the legal consequences and issues associated with such advances. Specific legal topics that will be covered include forensic uses of DNA, genetic privacy and confidentiality, genetic discrimination in employment and insurance, genetic testing in the workplace, genetic screening, gene therapy and genetic enhancement, pharmacogenomics, stem cell and tissue culture research, cloning, and patenting and licensing of genetic technology. No prior study or knowledge of genetics or molecular biology is required. The readings will include materials presenting the fundamental ideas of modern genetics.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Research Paper
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Gideon Fellowship



SLN #: 72569
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Hinshaw II

Course Description:
The Gideon Fellowship for Criminal Defense is a 12-month clinical experience beginning the summer following the completion of the second year of law school. Through the fellowship, a student experiences a progression of various experiences in indigent defense work at both the Office of the Maricopa County Public Defender and the Federal Public Defender’s Office.

The fellow is selected through a competitive application process and is formally awarded at the Annual Arizona Public Defender (APDA) conference in June.

The fellowship is open to one student per year following the second year of law school. NOTE: Please see the Gideon Fellowship website for more details. http://law.asu.edu/clinics/fellowships/gideon

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 1
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Government Relations



SLN #: 72579
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 016
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Harris

Course Description:
The course will focus on the foundations and techniques of legislative advocacy, the responsibilities of a lawyer in the legislative arena, and the strategies to follow, consider -- or avoid -- when representing clients before the legislative branch.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Halle Center Family Violence Legal Clinic



SLN #: 72568
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Dahlstedt

Course Description:
The Family Violence Legal Clinic will represent victims of intimate abuse. The Clinic provides students with an intensive education in the art of trial advocacy, community organizing and victim empowerment. Students will have extensive hands-on experience with family law and poverty lawyering. Law students will have an opportunity to interact with students from other ASU schools in The Halle Center, where holistic services are provided to victims of intimate abuse.

The Clinic is designed to offer students several opportunities to work with victims of intimate abuse in varied settings including contested protection order cases and larger cases such as permanent custody and divorce proceedings. Through their direct client service students will evaluate and critique current laws, policies and services available to victims of intimate abuse. Students will think strategically about how to enhance justice in the system and may partake in project-based work such as proposing new legislation, community programs and victim services.

A weekly mandatory seminar will prepare students to appear in court. Students will work individually and in teams of two on cases and projects. Students are fully responsible for all aspects of each case. Students will have regular meetings with faculty to review and discuss litigation strategy. Students are expected to think deeply about the universe of the client’s problems and goals, not just the particular proceeding in front of them. The Clinic aims to teach students to be skilled self-reflective lawyers equipped to litigate in various fields with an understanding and appreciation for justice lawyering and how to effectuate change in the legal system.

The Clinic is graded (6 credits). Students will devote 300 hours, approximately 20 hours a week to work at the Clinic.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Numeric Grade or Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 4
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: approval from faculty member required prior to any absence
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Health Law, Ethics and Policy



SLN #: 76151
Course Prefix: LAW-650
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Fuse Brown

Course Description:
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the legal and policy issues surrounding the delivery and financing of health care in the United States. The course will touch on a range of topics including: 1) Provider-Patient Relationships; 2) Health Care Access, Quality, and Cost; 3) Health Reform; 4) Health Care Financing and Insurance; 5) Health Care Fraud and Abuse; and 6) Health Care Antitrust.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: 10%
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Healthcare Entrepreneurship-Classroom Component



SLN #: 72566
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Coury

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Healthcare Entrepreneurship-Clinic Component



SLN #: 77948
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Shufeldt

Course Description:
Law students interested in health law will be partnered with early-stage Arizona based businesses, to solve problems related to formation, IP issues, compliance and regulatory issues, contracts, leases and licenses. Students will work with in-house counsel or senior leadership in these organizations. Students will learn about and address the challenges encountered while starting an entrepreneurial business. Students attend Professor Menkhus's Innovation Advancement seminar and meet with me in person or by phone weekly.

Students participating in this clinic will work with John Shufeldt, M.D., J.D., a Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law alum and co-founder of NextCare, Inc.

NOTE: This clinic will be divided into two components: 1. two credit hour classroom-based component which will be graded on a numeric or letter scale 2. four credit hour client-focused component which will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

For additional information, contact Prof. Eric Menkhus at eric.menkhus@asu.edu or 480-727-8856

Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 4
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




High Technology Licensing



SLN #: 87373
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 024
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Noblitt

Course Description:
Intellectual property/technology licensing is becoming increasingly pervasive in virtually every industry sector as companies increasingly license their own intellectual property/technology to others or license-in intellectual/property technology from third parties. In this course, we will examine the issues associated with various aspects of intellectual property/technology licensing. We will examine key aspects of patent, copyright (primarily software) and trademark licenses. We will also explore beta test arrangements, confidentiality/non-disclosure agreements, and agreements that provide that a company retains/obtains IP ownership in technology develops by employees and third party developers. We will also look at technology licensing issues associated with industry-sponsored technology standards-setting organizations/consortia and with technology transfer arrangements used by universities/research institutes to commercialize their inventions. The course will have a strong focus on the review and discussion of various license agreements with an emphasis on developing practical drafting and negotiation skills needed for licensing attorneys

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Intellectual Property or Patent Law are recommended
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Honors Seminar



SLN #: 86773
Course Prefix: LAW-394
Course Section: 022
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Berch

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Human Trafficking Seminar



SLN #: 81499
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 021
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Otis

Course Description:
The course will follow a child prostitution case from start to finish, and include interviewing witnesses and experts on the subject. Students will write two motions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes, students will write 2 motions
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 20
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Ideas of the First Amendment



SLN #: 81678
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 026
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Winer

Course Description:
This course on the First Amendment is based on a unique approach and materials developed by Prof. Vince Blasi at Columbia who has offered such a course with great success at several law schools for about twenty years.

The main text is Blasi’s Ideas of the First Amendment (Thomson West, 2006). Students wishing more information than is in this description should consult the text (the library should have a copy).

The premise is to organize the course, as Blasi puts it, “around leading thinkers rather than doctrinal topics.” Thus Blasi’s materials are organized around “seven of the most eloquent and historically significant articulations of the reasons for a strong free speech principle.” These seven classic writings range from political polemics (Milton and Madison), to philosophical essays (Mill and Meiklejohn), to “judicial opinions of unusual intellectual ambition and insight” (Hand, Holmes and Brandeis).This juxtaposition of perspectives prepares students to broadly examine and critically evaluate traditional doctrinal categories of First Amendment jurisprudence. And, as Blasi suggests, this approach also does better justice to the “majesty ...[and] complexity” of the First Amendment than a more traditional course focused on “pragmatic judgments of small compass” that emerge “by connecting the dots of numerous cases, presented in fragmentary form and organized according to problem area”.

In the Preface to his text, Blasi adds: “[I]t is the (more original) thesis of this book that such [doctrinal] questions are best studied not by examining, necessarily at a breathless pace, snippets of vast numbers of Supreme Court opinions that elaborate three-part tests and ever-proliferating doctrinal subcategories, but rather by engaging some of the greatest writings on the freedom of speech that have been generated in the Anglo-American tradition, and asking how those writings - some political polemics, some judicial opinions - might help one to think about the pivotal doctrinal questions.” Still, the course includes “most of the leading Supreme Court opinions interpreting the First Amendment,” and “virtually all of the traditional doctrinal categories are covered.” The text will be supplemented as appropriate with the very latest Supreme Court opinions in the area.

Another great benefit of studying the First Amendment in this fashion is that students will be forced to closely examine “how some of the finest practitioners of the art of persuasion went about building their arguments.” The course therefore is also a superb course in legal advocacy and rhetoric. By reading and studying virtually unedited selections by great writers (“well elaborated masterpieces of advocacy”), students should improve their own writing. Students often have difficulty “getting started” on a paper - choosing an interesting and manageable topic, developing an appropriate thesis, and the like. So, to assist this process, in consultation with the Instructor each student will be required to write an extended critique of one of the canonical writings (of the student’s choice) around which the course is built and apply his or her critique to a doctrinal issue or case.

Students wishing to earn an additional credit by writing a more substantial paper may sign up for a related 1-credit Independent Study with Prof. Winer.

Interested students should address any questions to Prof. Winer via e-mail at lhwiner@asu.edu.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes, Term Paper: See above course description
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Limited Enrollment Number: Yes, but flexible
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Possible
Participation Points: Yes, in accord with Law School Policy
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Independent Study



SLN #: 72561
Course Prefix: LAW-781
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-3
Instructor(s):

Course Description:
A student wishing to pursue independent study or fieldwork for credit must obtain approval of the Associate Dean and the consent of a faculty member to supervise a proposed project and must submit a statement in detail, defining the area of study and justifying the proposal. The faculty member assigns the amount of credit that the proposal justifies. In awarding credit to a student for an independent study paper, a faculty member should require a quantum of work from the student which approximates the amount of work expected from students enrolled in a regular course taken for the same number of credits. Faculty members should set minimum lengths for independent study papers based upon the complexity of the subject, the existing volume of literature on the topic, the number of redrafts required to complete the assignment, and the originality of the student's work product. Although exact guidelines cannot be formulated in awarding credit, past practices indicate that a paper of at least 50-75 pages, which has been redrafted one or more times after review by the faculty member, will be required for three credits. Papers of roughly 35-50 pages (with one redraft) should be required for two credits, and a minimum of 25 pages (with one redraft) for one credit. An independent study can be either graded or pass/fail at the discretion of the supervising professor.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-3
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Indian Gaming Law



SLN #: 87255
Course Prefix: LAW-720
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2/3
Instructor(s): Clinton

Course Description:
The Indian Gaming Seminar considers selected problems involving Indian gaming under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988. The seminar is not intended to be a survey course, but, rather, an opportunity for in-depth analysis and discussion of problem areas in Indian gaming. Indian Gaming concerns the federal, tribal, and state law regarding the development of gaming enterprises in Indian country. The course will examine the historical background behind Indian gaming and further examines the modern legal regime that governs the development of gaming enterprises in Indian country, focusing primarily on the federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988. Topics that may be addressed in the coverage of the course include constitutional questions surrounding the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, regulatory oversight of gaming management contracts, negotiating tribal↔state gaming compacts, legality of contributions to the state in tribal↔state gaming compacts, tribal gaming regulation, gaming on newly-acquired lands, tribally-specific limitations on tribal gaming, distribution of gaming income, and other legal questions arising under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988. Students who have not already completed Federal Indian Law I before the start of the seminar are encouraged to secure and review before the start of class the latest edition of William Canby, Federal Indian Law in a Nutshell. The seminar can be taken for two hours without writing a substantial/seminar paper or for three hours with the writing and presentation of a seminar paper. All students must decide within the first week of scheduled law school classes whether they plan to write a paper since it affects the scheduling of seminar class sessions. Thereafter no drops or changes in registration status will be permitted. Any student registered for 3 hours at the close of the first week of law school classes will be required to write a substantial/seminar paper.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2/3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes - See Syllabus
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Special Withdrawal Course: See course description
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes for students enrolled for 3 hours - See Syllabus
Participation Points: Yes -- See Syllabus
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: See Syllabus
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Indian Legal Clinic



SLN #: 76148
Course Prefix: LAW-776
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Ferguson

Course Description:
The Indian Legal Clinic provides students with the opportunity to work under the supervision of an experienced faculty supervisor to gain practical experience (1) working on real cases involving issues of tribal law and federal Indian law, and (2) representing real clients in tribal, state, and federal court, as well as in administrative proceedings. The Clinic’s practice is broad: students will have the opportunity to work on civil and criminal cases, and also do policy and transactional work. Clinic students handle all aspects of law practice, including time-keeping; client interviewing and counseling; drafting pleadings, motions, briefs, opinion letters and contracts; appearing in court; conducting discovery; and conducting trials, mediations, and arbitrations. There is also an advanced seminar component of the Clinic based on simulation exercises designed to help students develop trial skills including advanced interviewing, fact investigation, case theory development, client counseling, discovery, negotiation, ADR, and courtroom advocacy. Clinic students participate in weekly staff meetings to discuss pending cases and potential new cases. Attendance at seminars and staff meetings is mandatory. Students are expected to complete 20 hours of Clinic work per week which includes client work, seminar work, and Clinic meetings. Student-attorneys are also required to attend weekly staff meetings. Students will be required to attend trainings outside of regularly-scheduled class throughout the semester. The Clinic is a graded 6-credit course with no pass/fail option available. Enrollment is limited to 5 students and Federal Indian Law I and Evidence are co-requisites--these courses can be taken before enrollment in the Clinic or at the same time. Students are encouraged to take Evidence prior to enrolling in the Indian Legal Clinic. The Indian Legal Clinic is required for students participating in the Indian Law Certificate program. This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Federal Indian Law is a corequisite; Evidence is a corequisite
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 5
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance required at all seminars and staffings
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Innovation Adv. Legal Clinic (Client Component)



SLN #: 72567
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Coury

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Innovation Advancement Legal Clinic



SLN #: 76153
Course Prefix: LAW-777
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Coury

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Insurance Bad Faith Litigation (2nd 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87297
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 015
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Everroad

Course Description:
This course complements the basic insurance course by focusing on the tort of "insurance bad faith" and the litigation of bad faith claims. Among the topics that will be covered are insurance coverages and duties arising under insurance policies, types of bad faith claims (1st party/3rd party), elements of a bad faith claim, damages recoverable and unique procedural devices available to insureds/claimants (e.g., Damron and Morris agreements) and their prerequisites.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Insurance Law



SLN #: 72533
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Worischeck

Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to insurance law principles, insurance litigation, and the practical realities of dealing with the insurance industry. The class will cover various types of insurance coverage, with an emphasis on insurance's role in the commercial context, including bad faith claims, excess and surplus lines issues, business interruption claims, reinsurance, regulatory matters, understanding policy forms and their interpretation, the role and rendering of coverage opinions, and significant issues lawyers inevitably face when dealing with insurance issues. The course is designed to be broad-based in its scope of inquiry.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




International Arbitration (2nd 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87298
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 016
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Nadeau

Course Description:
This course will focus on dispute resolution through the use of International Arbitration, which differs greatly from domestic arbitration. It will be taught by a lawyer with deep experience in such cases around the world, from China, Indonesia, South America, Europe and the United States. As a secondary focus, the course will address Bi-Lateral Investment Treaties and the process for resolution of complaints concerning trade protections and “takings” by foreign governments. Because many courts will refuse to accord full faith and credit to foreign court judgments, the only viable mechanism to resolve cross-border commercial disputes is International Arbitration pursuant to a United Nations Convention.

This course is strongly recommended for any student wishing to participate in the law school sponsored International Moot Court competitions scheduled in April 2012 in Hong Kong, China and Vienna, Austria.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Intro Corp Tax & Policy



SLN #: 85679
Course Prefix: LAW-394
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s): Sage

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Jurimetrics Journal



SLN #: 72557
Course Prefix: LAW-771
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-3
Instructor(s): Chodorow

Course Description:
Web Site: http://www.law.asu.edu/jurimetrics

Jurimetrics, The Journal of Law, Science, and Technology, published quarterly, is the journal of the American Bar Association Section of Science and Technology and the Center for the Study of Law, Science, and Technology of the ASU College of Law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Jury Selection (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87289
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Paige

Course Description:
The process of jury selection is an important and fundamental part of trial practice. This course surveys the bounds of voir dire practice in state and federal courts and addresses variations in jury size and unanimity requirements between state and federal courts. Statutory and case law discussion will focus on the nature and number of preemptory strikes and important narrow issues such as utilization of race as a factor in the jury selection process. Appellate review of jury bias, jury misconduct, and the like will also be a focus of the course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Juvenile Law



SLN #: 81509
Course Prefix: LAW-635
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2-3
Instructor(s): Stanton

Course Description:
This course will include an analysis of the legal and philosophical bases for a separate juvenile justice system as well as an examination of how the legal system deals with children. Juvenile delinquency will be a central topic including: jurisdiction and disposition in the juvenile court, procedural differences between the delinquency process and the adult criminal process and the role of the lawyer in the juvenile court process. Other general topics will be state enforced limitations on the liberty of minors (e.g., "status" offenses, child labor laws, driving privileges, juvenile curfews, etc.) and abuse, neglect and dependency. The course will consider current reforms and the future of the juvenile court. Class trip(s) may include: Observation of proceedings in the Juvenile Court and visits to the Maricopa County Juvenile Detention Center and Adobe Mountain Juvenile Institution. Exemptions are available. Field trip may require alternative scheduling

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2-3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Short Writing Assignments
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Participation Points: Possibly
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Law & the Arts



SLN #: 81498
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 020
Credit Hours: 2-3
Instructor(s): Stanton

Course Description:
The course examines the intersections of law and the “art world.” We will consider the interrelated complex of painters, sculptors, print-makers, art schools, dealers, auction houses, individual and corporate collectors, museums and museum personnel, art historians, critics, experts, the art press, interested foundations, the relevant people at the National Endowment for the Arts and Humanities, state and local arts administrators and others, including a small but growing visual arts bar.

Among the topics this course discusses are: (1) International law and the fate of works of art in wartime: plunder and destruction as war crimes; restitutions and reparations; (2) the international trade in stolen and illegally exported art and antiquities; (3) the artist’s rights in the work of art: moral right, copyright and resale right (droit de suite); (4) artistic freedom and its limits (art as libel, political art and the First Amendment, obscenity, censorship through the licensing power, government patronage and support); (5) the artist’s life: artists and dealer, artist and museum, commissions, live-work space, toxic hazards, taxes, estate planning, legal services for artists; (6) the collector: dealing with dealers and auction houses; consumer protection in the print and sculptural reproduction markets; counterfeit art; experts; theft, art-napping and insurance; taxes, gifts to charity and appraisers; (7) museums: the legal character and obligations of museums; trustees, directors and staff; conflicts of interests; blockbuster exhibitions and insurance; de-accessioning and long-term loans; the problem of the insolvent museum.

All students do a brief class presentation.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2-3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: See Course Description
Participation Points: Possibly
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes, attendance and participation required.
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Law Journal



SLN #: 72556
Course Prefix: LAW-770
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 1-3
Instructor(s): Hessick

Course Description:
The purpose of the Journal is to produce, edit, and publish high quality works of legal scholarship. The operational and editorial functions of the Journal are run by students. Participation on Law Journal is hard but rewarding work. For those eligible, the journal provides one of the finest avenues for legal education thus far developed. Its work contributes to the student's intellectual advancement, to the development of law, to the legal profession, and to the stature of the law school.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Law, Science & Technology



SLN #: 77874
Course Prefix: LAW-703
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Marchant

Course Description:
Nearly every field in the practice of law now involves some interaction between law and science and technology -- whether it be litigation, administrative law, environmental law, constitutional law, telecommunications law, health law, corporate law, employment law, contract law, property law and many others. Lawyers who are knowledgeable and comfortable in dealing with the scientific and technological aspects underlying many legal issues are in great demand at law firms, companies, government agencies and other providers of legal services. This survey course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the various ways in which the legal system interacts with science and technology, and the skills and knowledge necessary to address such issues. The course will examine the interactions and conflicts between law and science using a series of illustrative case studies addressing current issues such as the internet, cloning, air pollution, the Daubert standard for admission of scientific evidence, tobacco research, the Microsoft antitrust case, electric vehicles, digital copyright, genetically modified foods, nanotechnology, anti-terrorism technology, global warming and privacy. No special background or expertise in science or technology is required to benefit from this course. Students can elect to take a take-home exam or write a research paper (20-30 pp.) for the course. This course qualifies as a “core course” for the LS&I Certificate program.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Optional
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Students can choose to complete a research paper or take-home final exam.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Lawyering Theory & Practice



SLN #: 72546
Course Prefix: LAW-637
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Schwartz

Course Description:
Lawyering Theory and Practice is a broad based survey course that introduces students to a variety of professional activities including client communication, negotiation, disclosure, depositions, and litigation. There are two components to the class each week: a two hour large section in which students discuss weekly readings and litigation strategies and view and discuss video clips from movies and television about the practice of law; and a two hour small section, which is simulation-based, and taught by leading trial attorneys and judges from the community. Throughout the semester, students work on two mock civil cases. In the context of the simulated cases, students draft pleadings and other writing assignments, participate and observe simulated client interviews and client counseling sessions, engage in negotiations and mediation/settlement conferences, and participate in client depositions and trial exercises. Both sections also study issues of competency and professionalism in the practice of law. All students will participate in a three hour mock trial at the end of the semester.

For 2012 and 2013 graduates, LT&P may be used to satisfy the core Trial Advocacy requirement of the College of Law’s Trial Advocacy Program. The Program’s course entitled “The Litigation Experience” is designed as an advanced course generally to be taken after (or simultaneous with) LT&P or Trial Advocacy. If both LT&P and Trial Advocacy are taken, only one of these classes will count toward satisfaction of the Advocacy Program requirements.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 24
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is mandatory and preparation is expected for both the large class and small section meetings.
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Lawyering Theory & Practice



SLN #: 74000
Course Prefix: LAW-637
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Schwartz

Course Description:
Lawyering Theory and Practice is a broad based survey course that introduces students to a variety of professional activities including client communication, negotiation, disclosure, depositions, and litigation. There are two components to the class each week: a two hour large section in which students discuss weekly readings and litigation strategies and view and discuss video clips from movies and television about the practice of law; and a two hour small section, which is simulation-based, and taught by leading trial attorneys and judges from the community. Throughout the semester, students work on two mock civil cases. In the context of the simulated cases, students draft pleadings and other writing assignments, participate and observe simulated client interviews and client counseling sessions, engage in negotiations and mediation/settlement conferences, and participate in client depositions and trial exercises. Both sections also study issues of competency and professionalism in the practice of law. All students will participate in a three hour mock trial at the end of the semester.

For 2012 and 2013 graduates, LT&P may be used to satisfy the core Trial Advocacy requirement of the College of Law’s Trial Advocacy Program. The Program’s course entitled “The Litigation Experience” is designed as an advanced course generally to be taken after (or simultaneous with) LT&P or Trial Advocacy. If both LT&P and Trial Advocacy are taken, only one of these classes will count toward satisfaction of the Advocacy Program requirements.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 24
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is mandatory and preparation is expected for both the large class and small section meetings.
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 72514
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Langenfeld

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the research and writing cycle followed in the legal community. The first step in this cycle is locating valid legal authorities, according to a research plan. The second step is determining which authorities are most significant and synthesizing the principles those authorities establish (i.e., statutory analysis and critical case reading). The third step is writing a well-organized document that communicates the author’s legal analysis: for this semester, that analysis will be objective or predictive, meaning that it explicitly assesses both sides of an issue and predicts a likely outcome. The final step is polishing the document’s style choices and citation formats to communicate effectively with a legally-trained audience. The course format includes classroom instruction, assigned readings, short research and writing assignments and exercises, and longer writing assignments. Enrollment is restricted to J.D. candidates only.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: None; must be J.D. candidate
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Participation Points: Per Statement of Student Policies
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 72515
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Herrera

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: J.D. students only
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 72516
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sperling

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 72518
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Langenfeld

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the research and writing cycle followed in the legal community. The first step in this cycle is locating valid legal authorities, according to a research plan. The second step is determining which authorities are most significant and synthesizing the principles those authorities establish (i.e., statutory analysis and critical case reading). The third step is writing a well-organized document that communicates the author’s legal analysis: for this semester, that analysis will be objective or predictive, meaning that it explicitly assesses both sides of an issue and predicts a likely outcome. The final step is polishing the document’s style choices and citation formats to communicate effectively with a legally-trained audience. The course format includes classroom instruction, assigned readings, short research and writing assignments and exercises, and longer writing assignments. Enrollment is restricted to J.D. candidates only.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: None; J.D. candidates only
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Participation Points: Per Statement of Student Policies
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 72519
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Calleros

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 72520
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Herrera

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: J.D. students only
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 72521
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 008
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Holst

Course Description:
Examines methods used to analyze legal problems. Reviews precedent statutory construction and basic res judicata problems. Use of basic legal writing formats.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 77861
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 009
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Noreuil

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 77862
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 010
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Holst

Course Description:
Examines methods used to analyze legal problems. Reviews precedent statutory construction and basic res judicata problems. Use of basic legal writing formats.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: Yes
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Legal Method & Writing



SLN #: 87269
Course Prefix: LAW-519
Course Section: 011
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Noreuil

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Lisa Foundation Patent Law Clinic



SLN #: 72571
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 008
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Gross

Course Description:
The Lisa Foundation Patent Law Clinic provides students with hands-on experience in real-world patent prosecution, licensing and litigation. The clinic is open to students having a background in science and engineering who are qualified to sit for the Patent Bar exam as well as students with a non-technical background who have a strong interest in patent law. Faculty will attempt to match students’ areas of technical expertise with available projects.

Students who have already completed the three-credit Patent Licensing & Enforcement course will enroll in the clinic for three credits. Students who have not completed Patent Licensing & Enforcement are required to enroll in the three-credit version of this course which is taught every other Fall semester (this course will be offered in the Fall 2011 semester) by Steven Lisa and other attorneys who work with Steven G. Lisa, Ltd. During semesters in which the 3-credit version of this course is not offered, students who have not already completed the course will be required to enroll in a one-credit course which consists of a lecture-based version of the material covered in Patent Licensing & Enforcement and will be held on Friday immediately following the clinic meeting.

Additional recommended pre or co-requisites include Patent Law or Patent Preparation & Prosecution. The clinic will be supervised by active practitioner, Michelle Gross (private practice).

Additionally, attorneys affiliated with the Law Offices of Steven G. Lisa, Ltd. will contribute to instruction. The 3-credit version of the clinic will be graded and the fourth credit (Patent Licensing & Enforcement course, when offered in place of the separate 3-credit Patent Licensing & Enforcement course) will be pass/fail.

This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Patent Licensing & Enforcement is a required pre or co-requisite; Patent Law or Patent Prosecution are pre or co-requisites
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Mediation Clinic



SLN #: 77868
Course Prefix: LAW-775
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Hinshaw II

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Numeric Grade or Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




National Security Law



SLN #: 87251
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 012
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Gordon

Course Description:
National Security Law

Course description

In the decade since 9/11, the Country has been engaged in a so-called “War on Terror.” This war has no geographic boundaries or temporal limits. The “enemy” is not a nation but a cause. This seminar explores some of the legal issues on how we conduct this war. At the foundation, we look at the major constitutional, statutory and treaty provisions that set the current “rules of engagement.” This includes the respective appropriate roles of the President, Congress and the courts. We will explore the basic legal question of our we dealing with enemies, common criminals or both.

Much of the course will built around the lessons we have learned or haven’t learned from Guantanamo.

There are also myriad of operational questions. How and where do we capture, detain, and interrogate terrorists or suspected terrorists? How do we gather information? What is the role of FISA and NSA? How does domestic surveillance differ from overseas data gathering? How do we distinguish between domestic criminals, enemy combatants and illegal enemy combatants? How do we distinguish between war enemies who may be subject to trial in military commissions and domestic terrorists who are subject to traditional criminal proceedings? Are military commissions legitimate in this context and how do they differ from article III proceedings? What are the respective roles of our many agencies including the Department of Homeland Security, Department of Defense, Department of Justice, the CIA, the FBI, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the National Security Council? What is role of local governments?

Ultimately we are faced with the question of whether this is really war, where are the boundaries between war and crime, do traditional notions of the law of war even apply?

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Numeric Grade or Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Natural Resources Law



SLN #: 87227
Course Prefix: LAW-639
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Feller

Course Description:
Most of the great open spaces of the western United States - forests, mountains, and deserts - are owned by the federal government in the form of National Forests, National Parks, National Wildlife Refuges, and lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). These publicly-owned lands are important sources of such commodities as timber, minerals, and oil and natural gas. They are also valued by the public for their natural scenery, recreational opportunities, wildlife, and wilderness qualities. Over the last several decades, these lands have been the scene of controversy and conflict over the environmental effects of logging, mining, livestock grazing, recreation, and other land uses. This course will cover the history of federal public land law, the administration of federal public lands, and the interpretation and application of the major federal laws affecting public land management, including the Endangered Species Act, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), the National Forest Management Act, the Wilderness Act, the Taylor Grazing Act, and the Mining Law of 1872. In addition to casebook readings and class discussions, each student will work with a small group of other students to prepare a presentation to the class on a topic of current controversy in public land management.

This course will serve as the prerequisite for the Natural Resources Law Field Seminar if that seminar is offered in May. The Natural Resources Law Field Seminar is a one-week traveling seminar that features visits to the Colorado Rive in Glen Canyon, the forests of the Kaibab Plateau, and desert rangelands on the Arizona Strip north of the Grand Canyon. To enroll in the Natural Resourses Law Field Seminar, students must have taken either Water Law or Natural Resources Law. Students wishing to take the Natural Resources Law Field Seminar (if offered) in May should take Natural Resources Law or Water Law in the fall.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Group advocacy presentations on current topics in natural resources law.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Neg/Draft Business Contracts



SLN #: 84160
Course Prefix: LAW-494
Course Section:
Credit Hours:
Instructor(s): Zimmerman

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Negotiation



SLN #: 77867
Course Prefix: LAW-733
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Batchelor

Course Description:
This course examines all aspects of the negotiation process. Students will learn the principles and skills associated with interest-based and other negotiation methodologies by participating in a series of simulation exercises, both inside and outside of class. The simulations involve settlement and other types of negotiations in a wide variety of legal, business and governmental situations and will require substantial out-of-class preparation. The course materials include both theoretical and practical readings. The class culminates in a complex, multiparty negotiation simulation. Students will be required to create strategic negotiation plans prior to negotiating, document the results of their negotiations and evaluate their tactics and performance. Students will also be required to complete additional analysis-based writing assignments.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 24
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Patent Law



SLN #: 77871
Course Prefix: LAW-645
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Karjala

Course Description:
A general introduction to patent law and policy. A patent is a federally-granted bundle of entitlements that include, most importantly, the right to prevent others from making, using, selling, or importing the patented invention for a defined period of time. The course will cover the history of patent law; the policy rationales for granting or withholding patents; a summary introduction to patent preparation and prosecution procedure; and a more detailed consideration of the patentability requirements (patentable subject matter, utility, novelty, nonobviousness, and disclosure), the concept of patent infringement, defenses and limitations to patent rights, and remedies.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Participation points may be given
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is expected
Online Course Site: None




Patent Licensing & Enforcement



SLN #: 72572
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 009
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Lisa;Kappes;Curtin

Course Description:
More than one hundred thousand patents issue every year. Hundreds of millions of dollars pass hands annually through patent licenses and awards. The vast majority of those patents and awards are the result of individual inventors and start-up companies. Thus, patent disputes involving valuable technology frequently involve small entities. However, the typical cost to enforce a patent can eclipse three million dollars, and if the patent involves fundamental technology, can reach ten million dollars. Presently, patent owners large and small are finding the enforcement environment difficult. As a result, only a small percentage of patents survive the financial, legal and political obstacles to a successful enforcement program. Although the creation of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) has done much to address problems such as forum shopping and inconsistent legal standards, the patent enforcement environment remains thorny and continues to evolve. This course is designed to teach the students the skills necessary to recognize the characteristics of a valuable and enforceable patent. Once those characteristics are recognized, the course will address from a practical perspective, how to structure an effective patent prosecution, licensing and enforcement program, as well as how to defend such programs. This is a hands-on course taught by patent litigation lawyers who have successfully represented a variety of patent owners in enforcement programs. The course will also teach and make use of a variety of valuable software research and collaboration tools.

GRADING: This course will meet once a week on campus for 2 hours and online for a 30-minute, online/telephone meeting, for a total of 3 hours per week. Teams of 2-4 students will be formed to present in class an evaluation of a potential patent licensing and litigation model, and an enforceable patent application. Patent Bar eligibility is not required. The course is graded pass/fail.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Persuasive Speech (1st 6 weks)



SLN #: 87290
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 008
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Goodwin;Schay

Course Description:
This course will meet on Thursdays for six weeks beginning Thursday, August 25. The final class will be held on Thursday, September 29.

This performance-based course focuses on persuasive communication skills. Borrowing proficiencies typically developed for the theatre and applying them in a legal context, students will gain increased confidence in communicating and advocating in the courtroom or ADR setting by developing such skills as:

Pacing;
Use of gestures;
Voice projection;
Voice modulation; and
Body positioning.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Philosophy of Crime and Punishment



SLN #: 72565
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Murphy

Course Description:
This seminar will involve the study of those essays that are, in the opinion of the instructor, the most signficant contributions to punishment theory published in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. (Contrary to what you might fear, this will not consist only of essays written by the instructor.) Extensive intellectual interactive conversation is encouraged, and for this reason USE OF LAP TOPS IN THE SEMINAR IS NOT PERMITTED. Grade will be based on class participation and a take home examination.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: None
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: None
Special Withdrawal Course: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 8
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: Take-Home
Mid Term or Other Exam: None
Paper or In-Class Presentation: No
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: ATTENDANCE REQUIRED. CONSULT LAW SCHOOL POLICIES FOR FORCED WITHDRAWAL FOR POOR ATTENDANCE
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Post-Conviction Clinic



SLN #: 72573
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 010
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Popko

Course Description:
Students in the Post-Conviction Clinic work to exonerate wrongfully convicted defendants and correct other manifest injustices such as convictions involving ineffective assistance of counsel and disproportionate sentencing. The Clinic may also review cases once actual innocence has been proven in an effort to understand how the wrongful convictions were reached, and to suggest ways to avoid the risk of such convictions in the future. The Clinic will focus on claims of factual innocence in murder, other non-negligent homicides, and forcible rape convictions where DNA evidence has the potential to exonerate an inmate. While doing so, the Clinic will work closely with the Arizona Justice Project, the Arizona Attorney General’s Office, and the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission in implementing a million-dollar federal Department of Justice DNA Testing Assistance Grant. Thus, students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively with inmates, defense lawyers, prosecutors, law enforcement, and investigators to exonerate wrongfully convicted individuals.

For more information about the course, see the Clinic’s webpage at http://law.asu.edu/clinics

This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 6
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Class Presentations
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Privacy, Gov't and Emerging Technologies



SLN #: 81679
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 027
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Askland

Course Description:
This course takes place in D.C. The first class will be held on Tuesday, September 6, and will meet on Mondays thereafter from 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm.

This course will identify the sources for privacy protections in tort, statutory and Constitutional law. It then focus upon contemporary challenges arising from (1) government policies and (2) emerging technologies, in particular the increased use and functionality of electronic communications, encryptography and rapidly improving biotechnologies.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: Yes, With Instructor's Approval*
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes*
Skills Requirement: No
Note: Only one of the above listed requirements can be fulfilled with this course.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Professional Legal Writing (MLS)



SLN #: 81508
Course Prefix: LAW-596
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Walker

Course Description:
This on-line course aims to help non-lawyers learn how to organize a legal research project by analyzing the facts and identifying the issues involved, determining the research tools needed to correctly investigate the legal problem, and systematically using these tools to strengthen and support the desired legal argument. Students will complete research and writing exercises. Students most likely will prepare one memorandum of law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Professional Liability Litigation (1st 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87287
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Rayes;Tryon

Course Description:
This class will meet on Thursdays beginning August 18, continuing through Sepember 29. There will be no class on September 1.

This course focuses on one of the most specialized areas of litigation; suits against licensed professionals, doctors, lawyers, engineers, architects, etc. The personal and professional consequences of such suits increase the intensity of the litigation. Add the fact that insurance policies for professionals, unlike other liability policies, often provide that the insured must approve any settlement, and the atmosphere surrounding these suits can become supercharged.

This course analyzes the elements and requirements of negligence claims against licensed professionals. The course explores substantive tort and contract law causes of action and defenses such as non- party at fault and the economic loss doctrine. Respondeat superior and its applicability to these cases, as well as developing concepts set forth in Section 56 of the Restatement (Third) of the Law Governing Lawyers, are also considered. The course also explores the impact that a claim of professional negligence has with the professional’s licensing board.

In addition to exploring the legal issues commonly experienced in claims against all licensed professionals, the course also addresses important practical issues that face the trial attorney such as insurance coverage, statute of limitations, statute of repose and claims in excess of the insurance policy limits.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Professional Responsibility



SLN #: 72547
Course Prefix: LAW-638
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Stanton

Course Description:
This course will examine the law of lawyering with significant focus on the ethical rules by which attorneys should conduct themselves in their various professional roles. The course will also examine the common and statutory law applicable to lawyers. The ultimate objective of the course is to give students both a working knowledge of the law governing lawyers and the practice of law and legal ethics and an appreciation for the difficulties and challenges that the professional currently confronts.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 35
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Professional Responsibility



SLN #: 72548
Course Prefix: LAW-638
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Cohen

Course Description:
This course will examine the law of lawyering with significant focus on the ethical rules by which attorneys should conduct themselves in their various professional roles. The course will also examine the common and statutory law applicable to lawyers. The ultimate objective of the course is to give students both a working knowledge of the law governing lawyers and the practice of law and legal ethics and an appreciation for the difficulties and challenges that the professional currently confronts

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 35
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Professional Responsibility



SLN #: 72549
Course Prefix: LAW-638
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Winer

Course Description:
This course will examine the law and ethics of lawyering. Emphasis will be given to the formally promulgated A.B.A. Model Rules that govern the professional responsibility of lawyers and their interpretation and application. Case law and other statutes and rules of professional conduct also will be considered, as well as issues in ethics and moral philosophy that inform the articulated standards.

A more or less traditional casebook approach will be supplemented with assigned readings.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 35
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes, according to Law School policy
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: REGULAR ATTENDANCE IS EXPECTED AND REQUIRED
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Professional Responsibility



SLN #: 87335
Course Prefix: LAW-638
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Clark

Course Description:
This course will examine the law of lawyering with significant focus on the ethical rules by which attorneys should conduct themselves in their various professional roles. The course will also examine the common and statutory law applicable to lawyers. The ultimate objective of the course is to give students both a working knowledge of the law governing lawyers and the practice of law and legal ethics and an appreciation for the difficulties and challenges that the professional currently confronts.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 25
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Prosecuting Trademark Applications (2nd 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87299
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 017
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Claus

Course Description:
This course focuses on the application process before the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) for trademark registrations. Included within the scope of this course will be considerations to be evaluated prior to commencing the application process, including pre-application trademark searches and evaluating marks for registrability, bases for seeking registration, priority of use, priority of application, use in interstate commerce, and specimens of use. This course is designed to follow a trademark application from preparation through to registration on the Principal Register. Attention will be given to the formal, procedural, and substantive requirements for trademark registration, the examination process, possible bases for initial refusal, strategies for responding to non-final office actions, final office actions, petitions to the Director, and appeals to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board. The course focuses on practical skills needed to successfully prosecute applications to registration before the USPTO, including drafting responses to office actions, developing the record, drafting briefs for appeals to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, and presenting oral arguments before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.

The course also necessarily addresses substantive areas of trademark law, which often provide a basis for refusal of registration, including that a mark is generic, merely descriptive, misdescriptive, geographically descriptive, contains scandalous matter, or that a mark is likely to cause confusion with an existing mark or prior application. Therefore, a basic understanding of intellectual property law is recommended but not essential.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: A basic understanding of intellectual property law is recommended but not essential
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Public Defender Clinic



SLN #: 72558
Course Prefix: LAW-772
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Lowrance

Course Description:
Students enrolled in the Public Defender Clinic represent indigent clients in felony cases under the close supervision of an experienced public defender. While representing indigent clients, students will receive intensive instruction in client and witness interviewing, all aspects of trial advocacy, sentencing advocacy, handling evidentiary hearings on constitutional issues, as well as in ways to improve their public speaking style. This training occurs in the context of offering quality legal representation to clients of limited financial means in considerable need of assistance.

Students are expected to spend 300 hours in the Clinic during the semester (approximately 30 hours of training and 270 hours of casework). As a general guideline, students are expected to work 20 hours per week. Students participate in a mandatory seminar, with instruction in courtroom advocacy, interviewing and counseling skills, substantive law and court procedure.

The Public Defender Clinic is a graded course (6 credits). Evidence is a pre-requisite. Trial Advocacy is not a pre-requisite, but if you have been through this course, the skills are beneficial to students' cases.

One week prior to the start of the semester, students are required to attend a mandatory three-day training session.

This course fulfills the professional skills requirement for graduation.

NOTE: Please see the Clinical Program website for more details as well as the application. http://law.asu.edu/clinics

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Special Withdrawal Course: Because of administrative considerations and professional obligations to courts and clients, no student pre-registered for a clinical offering shall be allowed to drop the clinic later than one month preceding the first day of classes, or to add the clinic, unless approval is obtained from the Director of the Clinical Program.
Limited Enrollment Number: 5
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Public Int'l Law



SLN #: 77904
Course Prefix: LAW-615
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Fellmeth

Course Description:
This course is an introduction to public international law, which is generally the law governing relations among states. Most fundamentally, the course will explain how international law has developed, how modern international law is made, and how it is enforced. As a survey course, we will also examine a variety of subjects regulated by international law, including among many others, how international disputes are resolved; the law of the sea and outer space; state conduct during wars; international trade law; international human rights law; and the activities of the major international organizations and tribunals, such as the United Nations and the International Court of Justice.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: No
Participation Points: 10 percent
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Per Policy, a student may be withdrawn for excessive absnece (Section IV. E)
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Real Estate & Business Valuation



SLN #: 77873
Course Prefix: LAW-656
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Birnbaum

Course Description:
This course will focus upon the valuation of interests in real property and closely-held businesses. The valuation principles to be examined apply in business and economic damages litigation, private property rights disputes, eminent domain proceedings, family law disputes, securities and insurance actions, and almost every other type of litigation which involves a determination of the value of, or damage to, an interest in real property or in a business enterprise. The same principles apply in a wide range of business transactions including mergers, acquisitions, financing and estate planning. This introductory valuation and damages course is specifically designed for prospective real estate, land use, corporate, tax and trial attorneys who anticipate practice in the real estate or business law fields. With respect to real estate valuation, the entire appraisal process will examined, including the provisions to the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). The three methodologies for valuing interests in real property (cost analysis, sales comparison analysis, and income analysis) will each be explored. Special issues, such as the valuation of leasehold interests will also be discussed. With respect to business valuation (including the valuation of professional practices), the course will examine the different standards of value, the compilation and analysis of necessary financial information, and the different methodologies available to assist in the valuation process. Among the specific methodologies which will be discussed will be the guideline publicly traded company method, the capitalized excess earnings method, and capitalized economic income methods. Discounts for lack of control and lack of marketability will also be discussed. Key cases and Revenue Rulings will also be reviewed. One class session will be devoted to a demonstration courtroom examination of a prominent business valuation expert. The course will also include an introduction to the use of financial statements and mathematics in business law. No prior accounting or mathematics training is required.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes, per College of Law Policy
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes, per College of Law Policy
Online Course Site: None




Real Estate Foreclosure (1st 6 weks)



SLN #: 87288
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Wilk

Course Description:
This course addresses the procedures and requirements for effecting the foreclosure of real estate in Arizona. Students will learn the entire process, from commencement to completion pursuant to the judicial, non-judicial and forfeiture statutory guidelines. Jurisdictional requirements, potential defenses, additional statutory and non-statutory remedies and appeal rights are among the subjects to be covered.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Research Methods in Int'l Law



SLN #: 72534
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Difelice;Fellmeth

Course Description:
International legal research, whether for professional or academic purposes, relies on materials and methods that are quite different from those required for domestic legal research. In particular, primary historical, governmental, and journalistic sources provide much of the source material for research in this field. This workshop will offer an introduction to methods of researching public international law in the library and through public sources (including FOIA requests), foreign source materials, and online resources. Evaluation will be based on attendance and research exercises.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Written Assignment: Yese
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 15
Final Exam Given: No
Mid Term or Other Exam: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: No
Participation Points: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Yes
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Securities Regulation I



SLN #: 82513
Course Prefix: LAW-640
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Harris

Course Description:
This course covers the basic concepts and problems in the regulation of securities transactions under the Securities Act of 1933, which is the primary federal statute governing rights, duties, and remedies in connection with the financing of business operations through the sale of securities. Topics covered will include the definition of a security and the exemptions from federal registration (crucial knowledge for the small business advisor), the registration process for public offerings, the contents of the prospectus, civil liabilities, and the applicability of the 1933 Act to secondary transactions (sales of securities by persons other than the issuing entity). In light of notable events in the capital markets in recent years, and because of the expansive scope of federal securities law and the draconian nature of the penalties imposed even for "innocent" violations, knowledge of this material is vital not only for business lawyers who advise large corporations but also those whose business clients are closely held. The course will not focus, however, on litigation strategy or technique. We will also examine the role of the state securities regulators and the self regulatory organizations.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Prerequisite: Business Organizations. Professor will consider on a case by case basis individuals who want to take Securities Regulation but who have not yet taken Business Organizations or are taking it concurrently.
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: The instructor reserves the right to add or subtract from the final grade to the full limit permitted in the Statement of Student Policies on the basis of class participation, attendance, and preparation. Participation in the class discussion is expected.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance and preparation are expected
Online Course Site: None




Separation of Powers



SLN #: 77864
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Bales

Course Description:
This class will study the separation of powers in our federal government by examining the impact of key historical events on constitutional law. Topics will include the election of 1800, the Civil War, the Great Depression and World War II, presidential impeachments, and the war on terror.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 35
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Special Topics in Employment Discrimination



SLN #: 81522
Course Prefix: LAW-630
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Kramer

Course Description:
This course addresses emerging issues in employment discrimination, paying special attention to the changing nature of sex discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Topics may include sexual harassment, sexual orientation discrimination, transgender discrimination, grooming and dress codes, intersectionality theory, and nepotism rules. Attendance and class participation are mandatory, and each student will be required to write a research paper.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Written Assignment: Research paper
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Sports Law



SLN #: 87254
Course Prefix: LAW-715
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Jay

Course Description:
Sports law is a course that deals with various legal issues relating to the structure and operation of the sports industry, particularly professional sports. The course reviews the antitrust principles that apply to sports, the labor law principles applicable to sports associations and professional athletes, the growing statutory regulation of professional and amateur sports, NCAA regulation of collegiate athletics, representation and counseling of professional athletes, and various other legal issues relating to professional and amateur sports.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Yes for students with regular attendance and contribution to discussions
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




State Constitutional Law



SLN #: 72535
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Kader

Course Description:
This course seeks to offer a systematic overview of State constitutional law, to amend the imbalance in constitutional studies, which focuses on the U.S. Constitution. The course will highlight the manner in which State constitutions express democratic self-governance, serve as foundational material in American constitutionalism, and are indispensable in structuring our Federal system. This neglected area of constitutional study is particularly vital now, given the modern revitalization of State constitutional law. Special attention will be given to individual liberties under State constitutions and interpretative issues generally.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Structure/Methodology US Legal System



SLN #: 78244
Course Prefix: LAW-105
Course Section:
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Rosen

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Structure/Methodology US Legal System



SLN #: 86249
Course Prefix: LAW-105
Course Section:
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Holsman Tetreault

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Teaching Assistant



SLN #: 82611
Course Prefix: LAW-735
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 1-3
Instructor(s):

Course Description:
Teaching Assistants work closely with the Professor to whom they are assigned. Teaching Assistants are expected to attend the course to which they are assigned and meet with the Professor weekly. Teaching Assistants are expected to be available to students and to work well without intensive supervision. Teaching Assistants can expect to spend an average of six to eight hours a week fulfilling their duties, although this may vary from week to week.

Teaching Assistants are chosen through a selection process determined by each professor.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1-3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Technology in the Courtroom (2nd 6 weeks)



SLN #: 87300
Course Prefix: LAW-793
Course Section: 018
Credit Hours: 1
Instructor(s): Ricketts;Williams

Course Description:
This course is designed to augment oral advocacy skills by introducing the effective use of demonstrative aids and courtroom technology. Students will consider whether, in a given situation, the use of demonstrative aids or technology will enhance, or instead hamper, the presentation of the advocate’s position. In the discretion of the instructor, students will learn skills such as (1) Designing effective demonstrative aids; (2) Using demonstrative aids; (3) Using courtroom technology for the presentation of deposition testimony, exhibits, and other evidence; and (4) Using outside technology consultants.

No written final examination will be given; instead, there will be a team trial presentation emphasizing visual presentations that will be graded and critiqued.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 1
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




The Litigation Experience



SLN #: 87274
Course Prefix: LAW-780
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Goulder;Zweig;Harrison

Course Description:
This course is designed to be the culminating experience of the Trial Advocacy Program. Using a “learning by doing” format, students will take a hypothetical civil case, from fact-gathering through the pleading stage, discovery, pretrial motion practice, ADR, trial and post-trial motions. Students will engage in performance exercises involving:

• Depositions;
• Pretrial motions;
• ADR;
• Trial;
• Post-trial motions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: None, although prior or concurrent enrollment in Evidence is highly recommended
Limited Enrollment Number: Each skills section will be limited to 6 students
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes. Grading is based on student performance exercises
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




The Litigation Experience



SLN #: 87276
Course Prefix: LAW-780
Course Section: 004
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Schulman

Course Description:
This course is designed to be the culminating experience of the Trial Advocacy Program. Using a “learning by doing” format, students will take a hypothetical civil case, from fact-gathering through the pleading stage, discovery, pretrial motion practice, ADR, trial and post-trial motions. Students will engage in performance exercises involving:

• Depositions;
• Pretrial motions;
• ADR;
• Trial;
• Post-trial motions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: None, although prior or concurrent enrollment in Evidence is highly recommended
Limited Enrollment Number: Each skills section will be limited to 6 students
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes. Grading is based on student performance exercises
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




The Litigation Experience



SLN #: 87277
Course Prefix: LAW-780
Course Section: 005
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Beauchamp

Course Description:
This course is designed to be the culminating experience of the Trial Advocacy Program. Using a “learning by doing” format, students will take a hypothetical civil case, from fact-gathering through the pleading stage, discovery, pretrial motion practice, ADR, trial and post-trial motions. Students will engage in performance exercises involving:

• Depositions;
• Pretrial motions;
• ADR;
• Trial;
• Post-trial motions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: None, although prior or concurrent enrollment in Evidence is highly recommended
Limited Enrollment Number: Each skills section will be limited to 6 students
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes. Grading is based on student performance exercises
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




The Litigation Experience



SLN #: 87278
Course Prefix: LAW-780
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Zimmerman

Course Description:
The first class will meet on Thursday, August 18 from 5:00 pm - 6:55 pm in room 105. Beginning Wednesday, August 24, class will meet weekly on Wednesdays from 5:00 pm - 6:55 pm in room 111.
The Monday session of this class will remain as scheduled.

This course is designed to be the culminating experience of the Trial Advocacy Program. Using a “learning by doing” format, students will take a hypothetical civil case, from fact-gathering through the pleading stage, discovery, pretrial motion practice, ADR, trial and post-trial motions. Students will engage in performance exercises involving:

• Depositions;
• Pretrial motions;
• ADR;
• Trial;
• Post-trial motions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: None, although prior or concurrent enrollment in Evidence is highly recommended
Limited Enrollment Number: Each skills section will be limited to 6 students
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes. Grading is based on student performance exercises
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




The Litigation Experience



SLN #: 87281
Course Prefix: LAW-780
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Peck;McKee

Course Description:
This course is designed to be the culminating experience of the Trial Advocacy Program. Using a “learning by doing” format, students will take a hypothetical civil case, from fact-gathering through the pleading stage, discovery, pretrial motion practice, ADR, trial and post-trial motions. Students will engage in performance exercises involving:

• Depositions;
• Pretrial motions;
• ADR;
• Trial;
• Post-trial motions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: None, although prior or concurrent enrollment in Evidence is highly recommended
Limited Enrollment Number: Each skills section will be limited to 6 students
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes. Grading is based on student performance exercises
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Topics in Bankruptcy Law



SLN #: 87249
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 010
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Curley

Course Description:
This course explores how local, national, and international companies reorganize and survive during these difficult financial times. With no prerequisites, this 3-credit course, initially considers the concept of reorganization under the current bankruptcy law. Building on this knowledge, the course then tackles the issues of how and why companies file a bankruptcy petition, what funding or assets are available to pay creditors, how a city or county continues to operate while in bankruptcy, what types of plans are successful, and what happens if the company is unable to persuade creditors to accept a proposed plan. From an international law standpoint, we will consider the background of cross-border insolvencies, the new model insolvency law, and the interplay of treaties and public policy in the company’s reorganization and how such influences may affect the legal result. The course will include certain case studies and problems to assist you in understanding the legal issues to reach practical solutions.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Participation Points: Outstanding classroom participation, which includes completing and discussing the problems proposed will count as 4 points in determining whether a student has passed the course.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Withdrawal of the student for excessive absences may result in a failing grade or as a withdrawal, at the instructor's discretion.
Online Course Site: None




Torts



SLN #: 72525
Course Prefix: LAW-517
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Winer

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Torts



SLN #: 72526
Course Prefix: LAW-517
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Depianto

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Torts



SLN #: 72527
Course Prefix: LAW-517
Course Section: 003
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor(s): Kader

Course Description:


Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 4
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Skills Requirement: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Trade Secrets & Restrictive Convenants



SLN #: 72532
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Gibson

Course Description:
With the increasing importance of intellectual property, companies must take appropriate steps to protect and maintain their valuable intellectual property. Much of those efforts must arise in the area encompassed by the intersection between intellectual property law and employment law. Proper use of trade secrets and restrictive covenants prevents unfair competition and allows employers to protect their valuable intellectual property, while still providing for mobility in the workplace. This course will consider the law of trade secrets, focusing on the principles set forth in the Uniform Trade Secrets Act, the Restatement (Second) of Torts, and the Restatement (Third) of Unfair Competition. The second portion of the class will focus on the law of restrictive covenants, with an emphasis on Arizona case law and principles. Students will learn principles of drafting effective restrictive covenants, non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements, as well as an overview of litigation strategies and techniques.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Students will be graded based on a 20-page paper (80 percent of the grade), and in-class presentation on a litigation topic (15 percent), and class preparation and participation (5 percent).
Participation Points: Participation in class discussion is expected. The instructor reserves the right to add or subtract from a student's final grade based on preparation and participation in class.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Trademark and Unfair Competition Law



SLN #: 77866
Course Prefix: LAW-691
Course Section: 006
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Halaby

Course Description:
This course’s objective is to provide the student with a practical, business-oriented understanding of trademark and unfair competition law. The course will cover general principles, including acquisition, maintenance, and enforcement of both registered and unregistered trademark rights. Litigation practices and issues will receive particular emphasis. The course will also address trademark dilution, cyberpiracy and other Internet issues, right of publicity, false endorsement, and federal deceptive advertising. At a minimum, the student should emerge from this course with a thorough understanding of why a trademark and unfair competition practice is one of the most fun a lawyer can choose!

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Possibly, depending on enrollment
Participation Points: Per Statement of Student Policies
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is required
Online Course Site: None




Trial Advocacy



SLN #: 72554
Course Prefix: LAW-738
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Sands

Course Description:
Students learn trial advocacy by performing opening statements, direct and cross-examination, objections, motions to the Court, final arguments and other aspects of trial practice. The course culminates in a jury trial. Student presentations will be videotaped for classroom critique. Students will also learn how to use courtroom technology for displaying or playing evidentiary exhibits or visual aids and will be asked to use this technology during their presentations.

Students who have taken Applied Evidence in Trial Advocacy will not be allowed to take this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Written Assignment: Yes
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes
Participation Points: Yes
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Trial Advocacy



SLN #: 87256
Course Prefix: LAW-738
Course Section: 002
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Cabot

Course Description:
Students learn trial advocacy by performing opening statements, direct and cross-examination, objections, motions to the Court, final arguments and other aspects of trial practice. The course culminates in a jury trial. Student presentations will be videotaped for classroom critique. Students will also learn how to use courtroom technology for displaying or playing evidentiary exhibits or visual aids and will be asked to use this technology during their presentations.

Students who have taken Applied Evidence in Trial Advocacy will not be allowed to take this course.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Prerequisite: Evidence
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes. Pleadings related to final trials.
Participation Points: Yes. Students are expected and encouraged to participate in each week's exercise.
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Truman Young Fellowship



SLN #: 72570
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 007
Credit Hours: 6
Instructor(s): Hinshaw II

Course Description:
More than two decades ago, the Arizona State Bar sponsored a series of internships designed to encourage highly qualified and motivated law students to become career prosecutors. Truman R. Young, Jr., a former Air Force Academy graduate and decorated combat pilot, was one of the students selected to participate in this honor program. During his internships and subsequent career as a prosecutor, Truman exemplified the qualities that the public expects of its advocates. On more than one occasion Truman declined lucrative offers from prestigious law firms to continue as a prosecutor. On March 13, 1982, Truman R. Young, Jr., was killed in a mid-air collision while piloting a National Guard airplane. In memory of Truman and in tribute to him, his friends and colleagues in conjunction with the Arizona Prosecuting Attorney’s Advisory Council and the College of Law, established the Truman R. Young, Jr. Prosecuting Fellowship.

The fellowship is designed to offer one third year law student each year the opportunity to participate in the type of honor internship program Truman Young found so rewarding.

The fellowship program is administered by the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Clinical Programs Office. The Truman Young Fellow works in four prosecuting offices during the one-year fellowship period. The offices include the City of Phoenix prosecutor’s office, the Maricopa County Attorney’s office, the Arizona Attorney General’s Office, and the U.S. Attorney’s Office of Arizona. The rotation schedule will depend on the needs of the participating offices, but the Fellow will generally spend about 3 months at each office.

The fellow participates in the program during the summer following the second year of law school working at the City of Phoenix prosecutor’s office 40 hours a week. The Fellow also attends the summer session of the Criminal Practice Clinic seminar. During the fall and spring semesters, the Fellow is assigned to three different prosecutor’s offices putting in about 20 hours per week. The Fellow earns 12 pass/fail credits and receives a $10,000 stipend and $5,500 tuition scholarship.



Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 6
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: Yes
Limited Enrollment Number: 1
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




US Law and Legal Analysis (MLS)



SLN #: 81507
Course Prefix: LAW-581
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Holsman Tetreault

Course Description:
This course will introduce MLS students to the U.S. legal system and to the types of legal reasoning used by lawyers and judges. Students will be provided the necessary instruction to use legal reasoning in their academic work, including reading and understanding cases and statutes, doing basic legal research and writing legal memoranda, and applying existing law to the issue at hand. Finally, the course will provide an overview of a handful of key areas that are particularly important for business and policy applications, such as federalism/pre-emption, constitutional law and administrative law.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Utilities, Sustainability and the Law



SLN #: 81500
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 022
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Mayes

Course Description:
Students will examine utility law in Arizona and the United States, with a particular focus on how traditional ratemaking is accomplished in an era of renewable energy portfolio standards, energy efficiency mandates and greenhouse gas emissions reductions regimes for electric and natural gas utilities. Since energy sustainability laws and regulatory policies are largely imposed on and carried out by utilities, the course will begin with an examination of the fundamentals of utility regulation. Additionally, the course will follow current trends in utility regulation such as adjustor mechanisms designed to pass through natural gas and other commodity costs, renewable energy and energy efficiency surcharge mechanisms and the rate-basing of renewable energy projects, construction work in progress allowances in rate base, and attrition adjustments. Finally, the course will address new and emerging trends in utility law, including a discussion of transmission policies promoting renewable energy development, federal and state efforts on Demand Response and the Smart Grid, and the regulation of greenhouse gasses, including proposed federal climate change legislation.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 16
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Victims in Criminal Procedure



SLN #: 72578
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 015
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Twist

Course Description:
Victims in Criminal Procedure will explore the historical and evolving role of crime victims in the criminal justice process. The law and litigation of crime victims’ rights at the state and federal levels will be examined. Among the topics that will be considered are constitutional and statutory rights for crime victims, the effect of these rights on the rights of the defendant and the criminal justice system generally. The question of enforcing victims’ rights and case law developments will also be considered. The course is a 2 credit course with the option of earning one externship credit for students who agree to work 60 hours during the semester for the Victims Legal Assistance Project.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Paper or In-Class Presentation: Yes, 15-20 page paper
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None




Water Law



SLN #: 72550
Course Prefix: LAW-643
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Larson

Course Description:
This course will address the basic legal principles involved in acquiring, maintaining, transferring, and adjudicating property rights in water. Some attention will be paid to riparian (eastern) doctrines, but main emphasis will be placed on the prior appropriation systems common in the west. The course will also cover groundwater law (with a focus on Arizona and doctrines in other western states), developments of new water supplies, instream flow protection, interstate disputes and allocation (with focus on the Colorado River), federal and Indian water rights, and federal-state relations in water management.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: Yes
Final Exam Type: In-Class
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Additional Attendance Policy: Attendance is Mandatory
Online Course Site: None




Workplace Flexibility Law and Policy



SLN #: 87613
Course Prefix: LAW-791
Course Section: 029
Credit Hours: 3
Instructor(s): Karin

Course Description:
This course addresses emerging issues in state and federal workplace flexibility law. Students will research potential changes to contemporary employment laws and prepare documents for use in the development of thoughtful public policy that supports additional workplace flexibility laws, programs, and policies for employees, employers, and the government. The course will cover the impact of changing demographics including the new multi-generational workforce and rise in dual-earning couples, as well as the matters related to the impact of workplace structures on military families, workers with disabilities, and others.

Students in the class will work together to draft documents that support potential reforms in Arizona and on the national level. The course will consist of: (a) class meetings in which the students and instructor discuss underlying legal and policy issues; (b) meetings with national and local policy stakeholders; and (c) sessions to review and provide feedback on student work.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 3
Grading Option: Letter Grade Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: Yes
Skills Requirement: No
Limited Enrollment Number: 12
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: Blackboard




Writing TA



SLN #: 76157
Course Prefix: LAW-735
Course Section: 001
Credit Hours: 2
Instructor(s): Herrera

Course Description:
Teaching Assistants work closely with the Legal Writing Professor to whom they are assigned and provide guidance and mentoring to first-year students. Teaching Assistants help with problem selection and generating model answers, hold office hours to assist first-year students with research, help create and grade research and citation exercises, occasionally help with class preparation and/or presentation, and assist with oral argument in the spring. Teaching Assistants generally do not play a major role in teaching and grading first-year students. Teaching Assistants are expected to attend the Legal Research and Writing Course to which they are assigned and meet with the Professor weekly. Teaching Assistants are expected to be available to first-year students and to work well without intensive supervision. Teaching Assistants can expect to spend an average of six to eight hours a week fulfilling their duties, although this may vary from week to week.

Teaching Assistants receive 2 Pass/Fail credit hours each semester (for a total of 4 credit hours). Some positions are for the year; others are for one semester only, depending upon the professor's teaching schedule.

Additional Information:
Credit Hours: 2
Grading Option: Pass/Fail Only
Graduation Writing Requirement: No
Flexible Writing Requirement: No
Skills Requirement: No
Final Exam Given: No
Attendance Policy: Per Statement of Student Policies
Online Course Site: None





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